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Even during the efforts of WWII, everyday life didn’t stop and economies continued to churn. Celebrating the history of that time is this 23-piece collection that includes pieces from the years of the great war. From stamps to coins to currency used across the world, you own a true collection that presents a unique snapshot of life during 1939 through 1946.

Set Includes

  • Coins:
  • One Jefferson Nickel, one Steel Penny, one Shellcase Penny, one German Reichspfennig, one Great Britain Half Penny, one Canada V Nickel and one Italy 1 lire
  • Notes:
  • One Malaya $10 Japanese Invasion, one Philippines 1 Peso Guerilla Note, one Burma 1 Rupee Japanese Invasion, one Burma 5 Rupee Japanese Invasion, one Burma 10 Rupee Japanese Invasion, one Burma 100 Rupee Japanese Invasion and one Philippines 1 Peso Japanese Invasion
  • Stamps:
  • National Defense U.S. # 900, Win the War U.S. # 905, Allied Nations U.S. # 907, Iwo Jima U.S. # 929, WW II Veterans U.S. # 940, Philippines 2 Centavos Japanese Occupation, Philippines 5 Centavos Japanese Occupation and two Germany Stamps
  • Certificate of authenticity

Set Specifications

  • Jefferson NickelCoin Grade: Circulated
  • Diameter: 21.2mm
  • Mint Mark: P, D or S
  • Mintage Year(s):1942-1945
  • Obverse: Thomas Jefferson
  • Reverse: Monticello, Thomas Jefferson’s mountaintop home in Virginia
  • Steel PennyCoin Grade: Circulated
  • Diameter: 19mm
  • Mint Mark: P, D or S
  • Mintage Year(s):1943
  • Obverse: A traditional pair of wheat heads flanking the words "One Cent" and "United States of America."
  • Reverse: Abraham Lincoln
  • Shellcase PennyCoin Grade: Circulated
  • Diameter: 19mm
  • Mint Mark: P, D or S
  • Mintage Year(s):1944-1946
  • Obverse: A traditional pair of wheat heads flanking the words "One Cent" and "United States of America."
  • Reverse: Abraham Lincoln
  • German ReichspfennigCoin Grade: Circulated
  • Diameter: 17mm
  • Mint Mark: A, B, D, F, G or J
  • Mintage Year(s):1940-1945
  • Obverse: Reichsadler with swastika. Lettering: Deutsches Reich.
  • Reverse: Denomination and two oak leaves. Mintmark below the denomination and between leaves.
  • Great Britain Half PennyCoin Grade: Circulated
  • Diameter: 25.48mm
  • Mintage Year(s):1939-1945
  • Obverse: Profile of the monarch, George VI
  • Reverse: Golden Hind, an English galleon
  • Canada V NickelCoin Grade: Circulated
  • Diameter: 21.3mm
  • Mintage Year(s):1944-1945
  • Obverse: Profile of the monarch, George VI
  • Reverse: The reverse features the letter V, with a dual significance. In addition to being the Roman Numeral for five (which was used on the U.S. Liberty nickel from 1883-1912), it was also the symbol of victory. It also includes the message, in Morse Code, "WE WIN WHEN WE WORK WILLINGLY."
  • Italy 1 LireCoin Grade: Circulated
  • Diameter: 26.7mm
  • Mintage Year(s):1940
  • Obverse: Head of King Vittorio Emanuele III facing left. Lettering: VITTORIO.EMANUELE.III.RE.E.IMP.G.ROMAGNOLI
  • Reverse: Eagle with open wings, looking right. Behind a fasces with axe. Below the Savoy Shield divides value, with at left the date and the mintmark, at right the Fascist Era. Lettering: ITALIA 1940 XVIII R L. 1

Please see the Details tab for note and stamp information.

Coin Glossary:

Die: An engraved piece of metal used to stamp a design on a coin.

Die crack: A small, raised imperfection on a coin resulting from a crack in the stamping die.

Early release: The Numismatic Guaranty Corporation (NGC) uses this designation for U.S. Bullion Coins during the first month of release from the U.S. Mint. To qualify for Early Release designation, NGC must receive the coins within 30 days of their release by the US Mint or properly documented as being received by an NGC approved entity within the same 30-day release period.

Encapsulated coin: A coin graded and authenticated by a professional coin service, then sealed in plastic.

Field: The typically flat area surrounding the relief and not used for legend or inscription.

Legal tender: Official money issued by the government.

Legend: The coin's primary lettering.

Lettered edge: An inscription added to the edge of a coin.

Luster: The quality of the surface brilliance on a Mint State or Uncirculated coin.

Mercury dime: Issued from 1916 to 1945, this U.S. dime featured a representation of Liberty in a winged hat that was commonly mistaken for the ancient god, Mercury.

Mint: A government controlled coin production facility.

Mint mark: A small letter stamped on a coin that indicates its mint origin, ex. "D" for Denver.

Mint Set: One coin from each of the available denominations in a particular year, produced by a single mint and made for circulation.

Mint State (Uncirculated): A regular production coin never used in trade and existing in its original condition.

Mintage: The number of coins produced.

NGC: Numismatic Guaranty Corporation.

Numismatics: The collection and study of monetary objects such as coins and paper bills.

Obverse: Heads, or a coin's front side.

Patina: Surface discoloration, typically green or brown, caused by oxidation over time.

PCGS: Professional Coin Grading Service.

Planchet: A blank metal piece used to produce a coin.

Proof: Expertly polished planchets and dies produce these coins which feature an extremely high quality strike, resulting in unmatched detail and brilliant surface finish.

Reeded edge: A coin edge finish featuring parallel vertical grooves all the way around.

Relief: The raised portion of a stamped design that sits above the coin's field.

Reverse: Tails, or coin's back side.

Rim: The raised ring around the perimeter of a coin designed to reduce wear on the relief.

Strike: The act of stamping a coin.

Truncation: The bottom edge of a portrait or bust.

Wheat penny: Lincoln cents issued from 1909 to 1958 bearing the wheat ear design on the reverse.

Mints & Mint Marks

Mints
The United States' first mint was opened in Philadelphia in 1793. Cents and half-cents were its first coins struck for circulation. Dies were cut by hand and each cutter added their own touch to the coin. Horses and strong men were the "machines" that operated the presses that made the coins. Mints were located in Philadelphia (PA), Denver (CO), West Point (NY), San Francisco (CA), Carson City (NV), New Orleans (LA), Charlotte (NC) and Dahlonega (GA). Only four of these mints currently exist: Philadelphia, Denver, West Point and San Francisco. The other four were closed soon after the Civil War.

Mint Marks
A mint mark is a small letter struck on an open area of a coin to represent the mint location where it was made. While mint marks began in ancient Greece and Rome, the first mint marks to appear on coins in the United States were in 1838. Mint marks were usually struck on the reverse side of the coins. In 1968, however, mint director Eva Adams changed the striking to the obverse of the coin in order to gain uniformity.

Mint marks are quite important to collectors because they help to determine a coin's value. A coin may have been struck in mass quantities at one mint, yet struck in smaller quantities at another. The coin struck in smaller quantities may be worth more than the one produced at a larger count. Mint marks are also important to collectors who gather the same coin from every mint it was struck.

The Philadelphia Mint has always been the main U.S. Mint location, yet the majority of coins struck there did not have mint marks until 1980. It carried the title of the world's largest mint until 2009. All coins from Philadelphia carry the letter "P". Pennies, however, are the exception, as they do not carry mint marks.

The Denver Mint opened in 1906 due to the gold and silver discoveries in Colorado. Coins produced there are marked with the letter "C". The West Point Mint opened in 1988 and coins produced there are marked with the letter "W". The San Francisco Mint opened in 1854, thanks to the gold rush in California. Coins produced there are marked with an "S".

Coin Grading
The grade of a coin is an essential element of information when it comes to coin collecting. The grade explains what physical condition the coin is in, therefore is important in determining a particular coin's value. Below explains the different coin grades given by most certification companies, from flawless to poor condition.

  • Mint State (MS-70 through MS-60): a coin with no imperfections after production at a 5x magnification is considered a MS-70 grade. MS-69 to MS-60 advises what level of Mint State a coin might be given the small imperfections; MS-60 is the lowest Mint State grade.
  • About Uncirculated (AU-58, 55, 53, 50): a coin where light wearing can be seen somewhere on the coin by the naked eye; MS-50 is the lowest About Uncirculated grade.
  • Extremely Fine (XF-45, 40): a coin that has light wearing throughout; XF-40 is the lowest Extremely Fine grade.
  • Very Fine (VF-35, 30, 25, 20): a coin that still shows the major details but also shows moderate wear; VF-20 is the lowest Very Fine grade.
  • Fine (F-15, 12): a coin showing moderate to heavy wear, but the major details are still visible.
  • Very Good (VG-10, 8): a coin with the design worn down by heavy wear, however the major design is outlined; VG-8 is the lowest Very Good grade.
  • Good (G-6, 4): a coin with flattened details but the design is still outlined, but some features of the coin are unclear; G-4 is the lowest Good grade.
  • About Good (AG-3): a coin with flattened details but the design is still outlined, however some of the edge of the coin is lost because of wear.
  • Fair (FA-2): a coin that is still identifiable in the design and outline, however the edge of the coin is no longer visible.
  • Poor (PR-1): a coin that is still identifiable in the design or date, but in the most poor quality.
  • Coin Certification Companies

  • ANACS (American Numismatic Association Certification Service): This grading and certification service certifies coins as genuine then grades and encapsulates them. ANA is one of the original grading services.
  • NGC (Numismatic Guaranty Corporation): NGC is one of the three most popular coin grading certification services today. They are considered a third party service, in that they are not directly controlled by any coin dealers.
  • PCGS (Professional Coin Grading Service): PCGS certifies coins as genuine and determines their grades according to a popular coin grading scale (of 1 to 70). They charge a fee for their services and seal the coin in a tamper-resistant protective holder. PCGS is one of the top three independent grading services today.
  • Coin Glossary:

    Die: An engraved piece of metal used to stamp a design on a coin.

    Die crack: A small, raised imperfection on a coin resulting from a crack in the stamping die.

    Early release: The Numismatic Guaranty Corporation (NGC) uses this designation for U.S. Bullion Coins during the first month of release from the U.S. Mint. To qualify for Early Release designation, NGC must receive the coins within 30 days of their release by the US Mint or properly documented as being received by an NGC approved entity within the same 30-day release period.

    Encapsulated coin: A coin graded and authenticated by a professional coin service, then sealed in plastic.

    Field: The typically flat area surrounding the relief and not used for legend or inscription.

    Legal tender: Official money issued by the government.

    Legend: The coin's primary lettering.

    Lettered edge: An inscription added to the edge of a coin.

    Luster: The quality of the surface brilliance on a Mint State or Uncirculated coin.

    Mercury dime: Issued from 1916 to 1945, this U.S. dime featured a representation of Liberty in a winged hat that was commonly mistaken for the ancient god, Mercury.

    Mint: A government controlled coin production facility.

    Mint mark: A small letter stamped on a coin that indicates its mint origin, ex. "D" for Denver.

    Mint Set: One coin from each of the available denominations in a particular year, produced by a single mint and made for circulation.

    Mint State (Uncirculated): A regular production coin never used in trade and existing in its original condition.

    Mintage: The number of coins produced.

    NGC: Numismatic Guaranty Corporation.

    Numismatics: The collection and study of monetary objects such as coins and paper bills.

    Obverse: Heads, or a coin's front side.

    Patina: Surface discoloration, typically green or brown, caused by oxidation over time.

    PCGS: Professional Coin Grading Service.

    Planchet: A blank metal piece used to produce a coin.

    Proof: Expertly polished planchets and dies produce these coins which feature an extremely high quality strike, resulting in unmatched detail and brilliant surface finish.

    Reeded edge: A coin edge finish featuring parallel vertical grooves all the way around.

    Relief: The raised portion of a stamped design that sits above the coin's field.

    Reverse: Tails, or coin's back side.

    Rim: The raised ring around the perimeter of a coin designed to reduce wear on the relief.

    Strike: The act of stamping a coin.

    Truncation: The bottom edge of a portrait or bust.

    Wheat penny: Lincoln cents issued from 1909 to 1958 bearing the wheat ear design on the reverse.

    About the Collection

    Discover the collectability of The Franklin Mint - the world’s leading private mint for more than 45 years. Founded in 1964, the Franklin Mint first stepped into the international arena by striking legal tender coins for foreign nations. Shortly after, the company expanded and began offering the general public coins and collectibles of the utmost quality.

    Today, Franklin Mint is known throughout the world for its impeccably crafted minted coins, die-cast models and collectible art. Offering rare pieces for first time and serious collectors, each item from the mint is an instant heirloom that can be enjoyed for generations to come.

    About the Guest

    Walter Kole is the Brand Curator for The Franklin Mint. As a member of the American Numismatic Association, Walter has over 30 years’ experience in the field of numismatics, philatelics, and related collectibles. He has purchased in excess of one million U.S. Mint and International official coins and limited commemorate issues. His decades of experience and passion for coins and collecting are evident in each rare piece that he presents.

    Note Specifications

    • $10 Malaya Japanese Invasion NoteNote Grade: Circulated
    • Obverse: Banana tree, guava tree and coconut palm, flanked by coconut palms to the far left and far right, which gave rise to the name 'banana' money.
    • Reverse: Beach facing the sea with a modern ship on the horizon
    • Philippines 1 Peso Guerilla NoteNote Grade: Circulated
    • Obverse: "Issued by authority of the President of the Philippines. This certifies that the Commonwealth of the Philippines will redeem this certificate at face value upon termination of emergency." "Payable to the bearer on demand in Silver Pesos or in legal tender currency of the Negros Emergency Currency Board." The green seal features an eagle on top of the Philippine coat of arms with text, "Commonwealth of the Philippines" and "United States of America".
    • Reverse: Philippines 1 Peso
    • Burma 1 Rupee Japanese Invasion NoteNote Grade: Circulated
    • Reverse: 1 Rupee
    • Burma 5 Rupee Japanese Invasion NoteNote Grade: Circulated
    • Reverse: 5 Rupee
    • Burma 10 Rupee Japanese Invasion NoteNote Grade: Circulated
    • Reverse: 10 Rupee
    • Burma 100 Rupee Japanese Invasion NoteNote Grade: Circulated
    • Reverse: 100 Rupee
    • Philippines 1 Peso Japanese InvasionNote Grade: Circulated
    • Obverse: The Rizal monument
    • Reverse: One peso

    Stamp Specifications

    • Stamp Type: National Defense U.U. stamp Scott #900
    • Denomination: Two cents
    • Mintage Year: 1940
    • Obverse: The stamp pictures a 90-millimeter anti-aircraft gun
    • Stamp Type: Win the War U.S. stamp Scott #905
    • Denomination: Three cents
    • Mintage Year: 1942
    • Obverse: Eagle/Win the War
    • Stamp Type: Allied Nations U.S. stamp Scott #907
    • Denomination: Two cents
    • Mintage Year: 1943
    • Obverse: An army of raised swords behind an uplifted palm branch of peace.
    • Stamp Type: Iwo Jima U.S. stamp Scott #929
    • Denomination: Three cents
    • Mintage Year: 1945
    • Obverse: Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima
    • Stamp Type: World War II Veterans U.S. stamp Scott #940
    • Denomination: Three cents
    • Mintage Year: 1946
    • Obverse: Honorable Discharge Emblem. The five stars surrounding the emblem honor those who died in each of the five services - Army, Navy, Coast Guard, Marines, and Merchant Marines.
    • Stamp Type: Philippines 2 Centavos Japanese Occupation stamp
    • Denomination: Two centavos
    • Mintage Year: 1942
    • Obverse: Filipino woman planting rice
    • Stamp Type: Philippines 5 Centavos Japanese Occupation stamps
    • Denomination: Five centavos
    • Mintage Year: 1944
    • Obverse: Mount Mayon (a symbol of the Philippines) and Mount Fuji (the symbol of Japan) together, with the rising sun between them to symbolize "unity."
    • Stamp Type: Germany stamp
    • Denomination: Six pfennig
    • Mintage Year: 1941-1942
    • Obverse: Right facing portrait of Hitler, Deutsches Reich, overprinted "OSTLAND" for "Eastern Front".
    • Stamp Type: Germany stamp
    • Denomination: 25 pfennig
    • Mintage Year: 1941-1942
    • Obverse: Right facing portrait of Hitler, Deutsches Reich

    Plastic Display Folder: 8-1/2" x 10-5/8"

    Distributed by The Franklin Mint.