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Featuring an original vinyl construction, the Crazy Sleeve fits notebooks up to 12", 13.3", and 16". Inner memory foam adds additional protection for your laptop, tablet and other devices.

Zippered Laptop Soft Case Measurements

  • 12-5/8" x 10-1/4" x 1" (12")
  • 13-1/8" x 11-7/16" x 1-1/8" (13.3")
  • 15-3/4" x 14" x 2" (16")

Made in China


AGP (Accelerated Graphics Port): A computer with an AGP will allow you to add a video card that will greatly increase the speed at which the computer can display graphics.

Bus: Refers to the path data travels on through a computer. Different computer models can have different bus speeds.

CD-R (Compact Disk Recordable): This is a CD that can be recorded or "burned" only once.

CD-ROM (Compact Disk Read Only Memory): A CD that stores information a computer can read but not alter. A CD can hold less information than a DVD but is also less expensive.

CD-RW (Compact Disk Re-Writable): This is a CD that can be recorded and re-recorded many times.

DVD-ROM (Digital Video Disk Read Only Memory): A DVD that stores information a computer can read but not alter. A DVD can hold more information than a CD.

DVD-RW (Digital Video Disk Re-Writable): This is a DVD that can store computer information that can be recorded and re-recorded many times. A DVD can hold more information than a CD.

Ethernet: A common method of connecting computers to a Local Area Network or LAN. Most computers today have ethernet capability.

Gigabyte (GB): This is a measurement of hard drive capacity. One gigabyte is equal to about one billion bytes.

Gigahertz (GHz): This is a measurement of processor speed. One gigahertz is equal to one billion hertz.

Hard drive: Also called a hard disk. This is where the computer permanently stores information, including the operating system and other software. This size of a hard drive is usually expressed in gigabytes (GB).

Hardware: The physical components of a computer system such as the keyboard, monitor and tower.

LCD (Liquid Crystal Display): This is a type of monitor that has a flat screen as opposed to a more traditional curved glass tube screen. LCD monitors are thin and lightweight and have little to no glare.

Megabyte (MB): This is a measurement of hard drive capacity. One megabyte is equal to about one million bytes.

Megahertz (MHz): This is a measurement of processor speed. One gigahertz is equal to one million hertz.

Memory: Also referred to as RAM, or Random Access Memory. This is where the computer temporarily holds the data it needs to perform various functions. The more RAM a computer has, the less often it has to read information off of a disk.

Modem (MOdulator/DEModulator): This is a device that allows a computer to connect to the Internet.

PCI (Peripheral Component Interconnect): A computer can have one or more PCI slots, which allow you add on extra components such as sound cards.

Processor: The computer's "brain." Processors are gauged by how fast they can access and interpret information, and this speed is measured in either megahertz (MHz) or gigahertz (GHz).

RAM (Random Access Memory): The amount of RAM in your computer determines how much data your computer can handle at once. If a computer only has a small amount of RAM, the processor must work harder to shuffle data around, which results in slower performance. There are two basic types of RAM:

SDRAM (Synchronous Dynamic Random Access Memory): This is the traditional, less expensive type of RAM. It is still commonly found on low and mid-range models.

DDR (Double Data Rate): This newer technology is faster than SDRAM, but also more expensive.

Resolution: The number of pixels per square inch displayed by a monitor. Most monitors support many different resolutions. The higher the resolution, the sharper the picture displayed.

Scanner: A device that can read text or images printed on paper (including photographs) and translate the information into an electronic computer file.

SCSI (Small Computer System Interface): Pronounced "scuzzy," this is a way for external components such as a keyboard, mouse and printer to connect to a computer. It has been largely replaced by USB technology.

Software: A general term for computer programs.

USB (Universal Serial Bus): This is a common way for external components such as a keyboard, mouse and printer to connect to a computer. Unlike older SCSI technology, USB devices can be added to and removed without having to reboot the computer.

Unlocked Cell Phones

What's an unlocked phone?
It's basically a mobile phone that's not tied to a single network or service plan at the time you purchase it. You simply buy the phone and then get it connected to any compatible network and service plan you choose. An unlocked phone needs a SIM card from a communications service provider or carrier before it will work.

What's a compatible network?
Unlocked phones use either CDMA (Code Division Multiple Access) or GSM (Global System for Mobile Communications) networks with an interchangeable SIM card. The GSM network is used by AT&T and T-Mobile while the CDMA network is used by Sprint and Verizon. When you buy your unlocked phone, make note of which networks it can utilize so you can find the appropriate service provider.

What's a SIM card?
A SIM (Subscriber Identity Module) card is a small, removable plastic card with a chip that holds personal information such as your phone number, address book, text messages and more. The SIM card also includes a security key with authentication information that specifically identifies the phone. Typically, an unlocked phone will not include a SIM card. You'll likely receive one through your carrier when you connect your phone to a new or existing service plan. Regardless of the SIM card's origin, the unlocked phone will recognize it and start sending voice and data over the network.

What are the advantages of an unlocked phone?
The first big advantage of an unlocked phone is that you're not limited to the small selection of devices that a particular carrier offers. You get to choose your unlocked phone from any of the available mobile devices that have a SIM card slot and are compatible with your network.

Along those same lines, you can buy an unlocked phone and add it to your current service plan without requiring a new contract. (Note that bringing the unlocked phone to a new carrier will most likely require you to sign a contract with that carrier.) You can take any SIM card from any carrier and put it in your unlocked phone as long as the phone is compatible with the network and bands. So, if you sign up your unlocked phone for service with AT&T and decide later to switch it to T-Mobile, you can still use the unlocked phone you originally purchased.

And with an unlocked phone, you don't need to wait for your contract to expire to upgrade your phone. Instead of waiting for your contract renewal to get a new phone, you can purchase an unlocked phone and use it now on your existing service contract. The added benefit is that when your current contract is up, you'd be free to cancel your plan and switch to any network or carrier you wanted – taking your phone with you to your new plan and carrier! You could also purchase prepaid plans so you'd have no monthly fees.

One last thing for you international travelers: With an unlocked phone, you'd be able to purchase and install a new SIM card from a carrier operating within your destination country so you could avoid paying the astronomical roaming charges associated with using a mobile phone outside the United States. And maybe you just want to purchase a cheaper unlocked phone for your trip and leave your expensive phone at home to keep it from getting lost, stolen or damaged.

What are the disadvantages of an unlocked phone?
When purchasing a new "locked" phone, the carrier often subsidizes the cost of the mobile phone. (They're making money off the service plans and other add-ons, not the device itself.) So an unlocked phone does not benefit from the subsidy offered when bundling the phone with a carrier contracted plan. You're responsible for the entire cost of the phone up front.


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