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If you like having options, you'll love this ring! Choose from an aquamarine, citrine, or rubellite gemstone to decorate the top of the design while color coordinating 14K gold forms a sleek and sophisticated shank. Want more? Go with the citrine option and enjoy the sparkle of a round diamond on the side gallery. Not enough? Choose the aquamarine choice and enjoy four round diamonds set around the bezel of the feature stone.

Ring Choices

  • Aquamarine:
  • Aquamarine: One round modified-brilliant cut 6mm
  • Diamond: Four round full cut 1.3mm
  • Citrine:
  • Citrine: One cushion cut 7mm
  • Diamond: One round full cut 1.6mm
  • Rubellite:
  • Rubellite: One oval cut 8 x 6mm

Ring Details

  • Metal: 14K rose, white or yellow gold
  • Setting Type: Bezel and channel
  • Diamond Color Grade: G-H
  • Diamond Clarity Grade: SI2-I1
  • Approximate Total Weight: (by ring choice)
  • Aquamarine:
  • Aquamarine: 0.73ct
  • Diamond: 0.04ct
  • Citrine:
  • Citrine: 1.50ct
  • Diamond: 0.02ct
  • Rubellite: 1.23ct
  • Measurements:
  • Aquamarine: 5/16"L x 3/4"W x 3/16"H
  • Citrine: 5/16"L x 13/16"W x 1/4"H
  • Rubellite: 3/8"L x 13/16"W x 1/4"H
  • Collection: Galerie de Bijoux
  • Country of Origin: USA

Warranty

  • Limited one-year warranty provided by vendor. Please call 1-866-588-4242.

Check out the Ring Sizing Guide to find your ring size.

All weights pertaining to gemstones, including diamonds, are minimum weights. Additionally, please note that many gemstones are treated to enhance their beauty. View Gemstone Enhancements and Special Care Requirements for important information.

YellowGold    WhiteGold    RoseGold    14KGold    Citrine    Aquamarine    Rubellite    

Yellow Gold
By far the most common color of gold used in jewelry, yellow gold is gold in its natural shade. Yellow gold is usually alloyed with copper and silver to increase the strength of the metal. How yellow the metal is depends upon the content of gold. A 14-karat piece of jewelry will have a brighter yellow hue than a 10-karat piece. Likewise, an 18-karat piece of jewelry will have a deeper yellow than 14-karat gold, and so on.

White Gold
Although gold is most often thought of as having a soft, yellow glow, the metal is available in an entire spectrum of different hues. The different colors of gold depend upon with which metals the gold is alloyed, or mixed.

Increasing in popularity in recent years, white gold has become fashionable as the preferred cool and contemporary look. White gold boasts the same properties as classic yellow gold, but achieves its white color by mixing with different alloys. In general, white gold is created when a nickel or palladium alloy (zinc and copper) is used. White gold may also be plated with an even whiter metal, such as rhodium, to enhance its cool appearance. As well, a white gold setting can enhance the rapture of white diamonds.

Rose or Pink Gold
Although gold is most often thought of as having a soft, yellow glow, the metal is available in an entire spectrum of different hues. The different colors of gold depend upon with which metals the gold is alloyed, or mixed.

Rose or pink-colored gold can be created by alloying copper with yellow gold. This hue of gold tends to have a pink, bluish tint that complements many skin tones.

Gold Karat
Gold's softness and malleability make it a wonderful metal to work with when creating virtually any design in jewelry. But this softness can be a drawback as well. To make it stronger and more durable, gold is usually alloyed, or mixed, with other metals such as copper or silver. The higher a metal's percentage of gold content, the softer and more yellow the jewelry piece. The karat weight system used to measure gold in a piece is the same for all hues, including white and yellow gold.

The word “carat” is Arabic, meaning “bean seed.” This is because historically seeds were used to measure weights of gold and precious stones. In the United States, “karat” with a “k” is used to measure gold's purity, while “carat” with a “c” is used in measuring a gemstone's size. The karat mark of gold represents the percentage of pure gold to alloy.

  • 24K is pure gold or 100% gold
  • 21K is 21/24ths gold content or 87.5% gold: In the United States, jewelry with this karatage or higher is rare. It is far more common in Europe, the Middle East and Southeast Asia.
  • 18K is 18/24ths gold content or 75% gold: This karatage is a popular high-end choice in the United States, Europe and other regions. Its popularity is spreading throughout North America.
  • 14K is 14/24ths gold content or 58.5% gold: This is the most common gold karatage in the United States because of its fine balance between gold content, durability and affordability.
  • 10K is 10/24ths gold content or 41.7% gold: This karatage is gaining popularity for its affordability and durability. Commonly used in everyday-wear jewelry such as rings, 10K gold beautifully withstands wear and tear. It is the lowest gold content that can be legally marked or sold as gold jewelry in the United States.

    In order to determine the karat weight of a specific item, simply look for the quality mark. Jewelry items will bear the stamp of their karatage based upon the United States or European system of marking. The United States system designates pieces by their karats—24K, 18K, 14K, 10K, etc. The European system designates pieces by their percentage of gold content. For instance, 10K gold is marked “417,” denoting 41.7% gold; 14K is marked “585,” denoting 58.5% gold; and 18K is marked “750,” denoting 75% gold; etc.

    Citrine
    Named from the French word for lemon, “citron,” citrine is a variety of quartz available in a range of golden hues from lemon, to straw, to sun yellow, to deep gold, to orange, brown and deep red. Darker colors are more highly valued, including the medium golden-orange and dark-sherry colors, sometimes called Madeira citrine after the color of the wine.

    Citrine crystals can form together with amethyst to form ametrine, or with smoky quartz to form bicolored quartz. Citrine is generally less expensive than amethyst, and is also available in a wide range of calibrated sizes and shapes, including very large sizes. Considered an alternative to topaz as the birthstone for November, it is also thought to be the traditional gift for couples celebrating their 13 th and 17 th wedding anniversaries. Citrine ranks a 7.0 on the Mohs Scale, and because of this durability, it is ideal for jewelry wear.

    Citrine is found in volcanic rocks and quartz veins and owes its color to the presence of iron. Most citrine is mined in Brazil, but almost all of the Brazilian material is heat-treated amethyst. Supplies are most plentiful in the Brazilian state of Rio Grande do Sul, particularly from the Serra Mine. The Ira' Mine also produces large quantities of the gem. Citrine can also be found in the Ural Mountains of Russia, in Dauphine, France, and in Madagascar.

    In ancient times, citrine was carried as a protection against snake venom and evil thoughts. It was thought to give calmness and mental balance to its wearer. Throughout history, people have confused citrine for topaz. Many citrines were sold as topaz and thus thought to carry the same qualities, such as knowledge and beauty. Today, citrine symbolizes truth and integrity, and is believed to promote creativity and personal clarity. It is also believed to impart happiness and cheer to its wearer while raising self esteem, as well as cleanse, regenerate and attract abundance.

    Aquamarine:
    Aquamarine's name was derived from the Latin terms "aqua" meaning water and "mare" for sea. According to legend, aquamarine was the treasure of mermaids and held the power to keep sailors safe at sea. Sailors carried it to stay in the good graces of Poseidon and ward off seasickness. Other folklore says that aquamarine was the stone of the sea-goddesses and sirens. Sea goddesses were said to cleanse the stone in the ocean water at night by the light of the full moon. Beads of aquamarine are even found in ancient Egyptian mummy tombs, used as a tribute to the gods of the netherworld for safe passage.

    From the lightest sky-blue to the deepest sea blue, aquamarines are found in an exceptionally beautiful spectrum of blue hues. With its clear brilliance, deeper colors are unusual in smaller sizes since it generally takes a larger stone to hold a darker shade. The most prized aquamarines are those displaying a deep, intense, pure blue with no green tints. These are more rare and therefore more valuable. Unlike its emerald sister, aquamarine is known for being relatively free of inclusions with evenly distributed color. It retains excellent clarity, which is why aquamarines are frequently cut with large step facets to show off their flawless surfaces, immaculate transparency and high brilliance.

    The different shades of aquamarine are distinguished by their names. "Santa Maria" is the name for the rare, intensely deep blue aquamarines found in the Santa Maria de Itabira Mine in Brazil. Similar colors are found in some of the sparse aquamarine gemstone mines in Africa, especially in Mozambique. In order to better distinguish them, these aquamarines are denoted as "Santa Maria Africana." Not quite as deeply blue are "Espirito Santo" aquamarines from the Brazilian state of Espirito Santo. Another beautiful color has been named in honor of a Brazilian beauty queen from 1954, and has become famous as "Martha Rocha."

    Aquamarine is thought to possess a number of mystical properties , with powers that allegedly develop best if the stone is immersed in sun-drenched water. It is a stone of peace, joy and happiness, especially in the renewing of relationships. Its pale blue color arises sympathy, trust and harmony, all feelings that soothe and calm emotional fires or problems. The gem is said to re-awaken love in married couples or spark new friendships. In fact, carrying an aquamarine is supposed to guarantee a happy marriage and to make its owner happy. As a necklace, it is the most magically ideal gift for a groom to give his bride on the day of their nuptials.

    In ancient times, aquamarine was thought to be capable of preserving youth and health. In magic today, this beautiful stone is worn or carried to enhance the utilization of psychic powers. Aquamarine can be worn as a magic charm to ensure good health, to halt fear and to strengthen courage. Because it is a cleansing and purification stone, it can be worn or rubbed on the body as a part of a purification ritual. Aquamarine can also be worn or carried as a protective amulet while sailing or flying over water. Fishermen, sailors and pilots have long made it their special amulet against danger. Other modern beliefs suggest the Santa Maria aquamarine makes the heart beat faster.

    Now and then, sensationally large crystals are found. The largest known aquamarine is a 243-pound stone found in Brazil in 1920. It was cut into many smaller stones, and a 13-pound uncut piece resides in the American Museum of Natural History. Another noted aquamarine is an 879.50ct step-cut flawless sea green stone that is on display in the British Museum of Natural History. Aquamarine is found in many exotic places around the world, including Afghanistan, Angola, Kenya, Madagascar, Mozambique, Nigeria, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Russia, Zambia and Zimbabwe. Most of the gemstones available in the market today, however, come from Brazil.

    Many modern designers have named aquamarine as their favorite stone, as its light color allows for a special creative freedom to bring out the character and brilliance of each stone. Gemstone artists get their inspiration for new cuts more often from aquamarines than from any other stone. These creative designer cuts have no doubt contributed to its high popularity. Aquamarine is the March birthstone and has become the traditional gift for 16 th and 19 th anniversary gifts. With an 8.0 ranking on the Mohs Scale , the stone is very durable and can stand up to everyday wear. It is the symbol for youth, hope, health and fidelity.

    Rubellite:
    Because tourmaline is found in a wide range of colors, the gemstone trade generally does not use separate names for the gem’s individual varieties. Rather, the color is added to the beginning of the name, such as green tourmaline or pink tourmaline. However, there is a very special exception to this rule when it comes to the select tourmaline called rubellite.

    Famous for its exquisite reddish-pinkish-purple color, rubellite is a tourmaline that is well-known for representing the joy of life and the passion of seduction. With a name derived from the Latin term “rubellus,” which means “reddish,” this exceptionally beautiful gemstone features a unique characteristic. Its color remains consistent in daylight and artificial light. While many gemstones change their color depending on the source of light, rubellite never changes. In contrast, the color of most other pink and red tourmalines shows a noticeable brownish hue in artificial light. But rubellite’s perfect reddish-pink color stays brilliant, making it a gorgeous anomaly in the gemstone world.

    The majority of the stones are found in Brazil, Madagascar, Mozambique, Nigeria and Pakistan, but some beautiful pink rubellites have recently been discovered in the United States.