Skip to main content
GEMS EN VOGUE 20TH ANNIVERSARY - Celebrate with Special Event Pricing
Hurry! Celebrate National Watch Day with 6 ValuePay® payments on (virtually) all virtually everything. Ends tonight!

Fierra 1.15ctw Oval Cut 8 x 6mm Ruby Loose Gemstone

Make this oval cut ruby the centerpiece of your own one-of-a-kind necklace, bracelet or ring. Rubies are all about love so make it part of a creative gift for someone special or use it in a piece for yourself to let everyone know you're a true romantic.

Stone Details

  • Gemstone: Ruby
  • Cut: Oval
  • Approximate Total Weight: 1.15ct
  • Measurements: 8 x 6mm
  • Collection: Fierra
  • Country of Origin: Mozambique

All weights pertaining to gemstones, including diamonds, are minimum weights. Additionally, please note that many gemstones are treated to enhance their beauty. View Gemstone Enhancements and Special Care Requirements for important information.

LooseStones    Ruby    
Gemstone Glossary

Cut: Refers to the geometric shape and proportions of a gemstone. A gemstone’s cut is what most directly affects its sparkle or brilliance.

Facet: A flat cut on the surface of a gemstone.

Fire: Flashes of rainbow colors. Also called “dispersion.”

Hardness: Resistance to scratching. The higher the number, the more resistant.

Hue: Another word for color.

Luster: The shininess of a jewel.

Opaque: The opposite of transparent. Light cannot pass through an opaque gemstone, therefore they do not have any sparkle or fire.

Saturation: This term refers to how pure or deep a gemstone’s color is. Some gemstones, like aquamarine, have a naturally low saturation (very light blue) while other gemstones, like amethysts, can have very high saturation (rich, dark purple).

Sparkle: The white light leaving a jewel, traveling upward, which is visible to the eye. Sparkle is often referred to as “brilliance.”

Toughness: Resistance to breakage.

Gemstone Shapes & Cuts
These are the common shapes or cuts for gemstones, each lending a different look and allure.

Baguette: Baguette means “stick” or “rod” in French, which makes it a very appropriate name for this gemstone shape. Diamond baguettes are often used as accent stones to flank a primary stone.

Brilliant: Any gemstone cut with 58 facets, which produces the maximum possible sparkle. A brilliant cut can have several shapes, including round, oval, pear, radiant and heart.

Cabochon: This shape features a rounded, perfectly smooth surface instead of facets. It is the oldest gemstone shape and is commonly used with opaque stones such as opal, jade and turquoise.

Cushion: A very popular style for most of the 19th century, cushion shapes are slightly domed with rounded corners that make the stone look like a pillow. In fact, this shape is often referred to as a “pillow cut.” It looks particularly beautiful in candlelight.

Emerald: With its long, steep facets, emerald cuts tend to flash rather than sparkle.

Fancy: Technically, this term refers to any type of gemstone that isn’t round, but many jewelers reserve it to describe the more exotic gemstone shapes such as marquise, heart, pear and trillion.

Heart: Often described as a custom cut, heart-shaped gemstones are very popular for pendants.

Marquise: According to legend, this shape was commissioned by King Louis XV to resemble the smile of his mistress, Marquise de Pompadour. Ideal marquise cuts have a length to width ratio of 2:1.

Oval: Similar to the round shape, oval gemstones produce a high amount of sparkle and fire.

Pear: This is a classic teardrop shape that is ideal for earrings and pendants.

Princess: This a relatively new shape that combines the sharp, flat edges of an emerald shape with numerous small facets, which produce both sparkle and fire.

Radiant: This shape is similar to emerald, but it adds extra facets on the edges and corners to increase the gemstone’s sparkle.

Round: This classic shape produces maximum sparkle and fire, making it an ideal shape for diamonds.

Tapered Baguette: A tapered baguette is a baguette shape with one end that is narrower than the other.

Trillion: A very striking, usually three-sided shape, trillion gemstones (especially diamonds) are celebrated for the intense fire they produce.

The Mohs Scale
The most common measure of a gemstone's degree of hardness is based on the Mohs Scale. Devised by German geologist Friedrich Mohs in 1812, the Mohs Scale grades minerals on a comparative scale from 1 (very soft) to 10 (very hard).

Hardness is generally associated with durability and the ability to resist breakage. When referring to gemstones, however, hardness more accurately means the stone's ability to resist abrasion. What the scale means is that a mineral of a given hardness rating will scratch other minerals of the same rating, as well as any minerals of a lower hardness rating. For example, rubies and sapphires, which are composed of the mineral corundum and have a Mohs rating of 9, will scratch each other, as well as topaz (rating 8) and quartz (rating 7). But they will not scratch diamonds, which are rated 10 and considered the hardest substance.

The numeric values assigned to each interval of hardness are not equal. Some stones are disproportionately harder than others. Because Mohs Scale wasn't made for exact precision, it uses half numbers for in-between hardness ratings.

Ruby:
For thousands of years, ruby has been considered one of the most valuable gemstones on Earth. It is called the "King of Gemstones" and known as the stone of love. The gem is the red variety of the mineral corundum, and while any other color of corundum is denominated as "sapphire," only red corundum may be called "ruby. " Pure corundum is colorless, but slight traces of elements are responsible for ruby's purplish bluish-red to orange-red color. In fact, the name "ruby" was derived from the Latin word "rubens,"meaning "red."

The finest rubies are an intensely saturated pure red with no overtones of brown or blue. They are readily available in sizes up to 2.00ct and have incredible durability, ranking a 9.0 on the Mohs Scale (second only to diamonds in hardness). Rubies may show very different shades of red depending on their origin, and the range of these reds is quite considerable. The gem's intense color was once thought to come from an undying flame inside the stone, while other legends say each stone is a piece of the planet Mars.

Color is the gem's most important feature to determine its value, yet transparency is a close second. Rubies that are clear with no visible inclusions are more valuable than those with visible internal flaws. Inclusions, however, do not affect the quality of a ruby unless they decrease the transparency of the stone or are located at the center of its table. Inclusions within a ruby are something like the gem's fingerprints, stating its individuality while at the same time proving its genuineness from nature. Some rubies distinguish themselves with a wonderful silky shine, called the "silk" of the stone, which is created by fine rutile needles within the gem.

The rutile mineral is also involved within very scarce star rubies. As can be found in sapphires, there is a translucent variety of ruby that displays a six-point star when cut into a smooth domed cabochon. Rutile is embedded in an asterisk-shape within the ruby, causing a captivating light effect called "asterism." Six-ray stars appear to magically glide across the surface of the stones as they are moved. Star rubies are expensive rarities and should always display the stars exactly in the center of the gem. The star stone is said to be the home of each person's angel, who lives there in contentment with the ruby's spirit.

Rubies are found in many countries throughout the world, each location producing rubies of specific qualities and colors. Rubies from Thailand are often dark red tending towards brown, a color called "Siam." Rare rubies from Ceylon are mainly light red, like ripe raspberries, while rubies of Vietnamese origin generally display a slightly purplish hue. Rubies are also produced in India, where relatively large ruby crystals have been discovered. These particular rubies, however, have many inclusions, but are excellently suited to be cut as beads or cabochons. Afghanistan, Pakistan and Russia have also produced top-quality rubies, but the rough terrain in these areas makes mining difficult.

Kenya and Tanzania are also becoming more important as mining sources for ruby. Their light to dark red colors rival the world's best rubies, yet most of the stones are fraught with inclusions that diminish their transparency and value. Like those found in India, however, the East African rubies can be cut into beautiful cabochons to enhance their color and conceal their imperfections.

Top-quality rubies are quite rare and are often considered even more valuable than colorless diamonds, particularly in sizes above 5.00ct. High prices tend to reflect their tremendous value. In 1988, a 16.00ct ruby sold at auction for $227,301 at Sotheby's in Geneva, Switzerland. A 27.37ct Burmese ruby ring sold for $4 million at Sotheby's in 1995, which was an astounding $146,145 per carat.

It is possible that no other gemstone has been as prized as the ruby. Celebrated in the Bible and in ancient Sanskrit writings as the most precious of all gemstones, rubies have adorned emperors and kings throughout history. Until improvements in chemical testing in the 1800s, most red gem-quality stones were called rubies. Thus, many of the famous "rubies" in the crown jewels of Europe, including Britain's "Black Ruby" and the "Timur Ruby," have since been identified as red spinels or garnets. Today, rubies continue to decorate the insignia of many Royal Houses.

In the 13th century, traveler Marco Polo wrote that Kublai Kahn, the Mongol Emperor of China, once offered an entire city for a ruby the size of a man's finger. In ancient Hindu writings, the ruby represents the sun power. In China, the stone was given as offerings to Buddha.

Rubies were also given as offerings to Krishna in India. For a long time, India was considered the classical country of rubies. Their literature offers a rich and varied knowledge of the stone that was collected and handed down for over two thousand years. In the Sanskrit language, ruby is called "ratnaraj," which translates as "king of gemstones." Whenever a spectacular ruby was found, the emperor would send out his notables to welcome the precious gemstone in an appropriate style fit for a king.

In the Middle Ages, it was believed that a ruby could change color and grow darker to warn its owner that danger or illness was near. Thought to ward off misfortune, it was believed to chase away evil spirits and the spirits of the dead. The deep red color of rubies has been used for centuries as protection and to convey invulnerability. Soldiers wore them into battle to guard against wounds and promote healing if they received a wound. The color of blood, the stone is symbolic of courage and bravery. Warriors were said to have implanted rubies under their skin to bring them valor in battle, make them invincible against enemies and ensure victory.

Rubies have also been historically thought to bestow wisdom, wealth and love. In China and Europe during the 10th century, dragons and snakes were carved in the gems' surfaces to increase the flow of money and power to their owners. A common belief was that dreaming of rubies meant the coming of success in business and money matters. Rubies were also used to capture a mate and light the passion of romance. The gem was believed to have the magical powers of sexual fire and success in love. It has also been said by ancient lore to be capable of reconciling lovers' quarrels.

It is believed that ruby should be worn with gold to banish sadness and bring joy. Given as a symbol of success, devotion and integrity, the ruby is July's birthstone and the traditional gift for 15th and 40 th wedding anniversaries. Rubies have symbolized passion and romance for centuries, so when placed in engagement rings, they express unbridled love and promise of the heart.