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Gemporia Sterling Silver Champagne & Cognac Baltic Amber Cross Pendant w/ Chain

Lovely style from lovely Gemporia jewelry. This cross shaped pendant features champagne and cognac Baltic amber cabochons crossing a light yellow brown Baltic amber cabochon with a rhodium over sterling silver overlay bringing them all together. The included 18" cable link chain hosts a 2" extension with an additional Baltic amber bead at the end. Go forth and display your Gemporia faith.

Pendant Details

  • Metal: Rhodium over sterling silver
  • Stone Information:
  • Two fancy shaped 10 x 5mm light yellow Baltic amber compressed cabochons
  • One 19 x 5mm and one 10 x 5mm fancy shaped brown compressed Baltic amber cabochons
  • One round full-drilled 6mm brown compressed Baltic amber
  • Setting Type: Pin / adhesive, pin
  • Measurements:
  • Pendant: 1-13/16"L x 1"W x 3/16"H
  • Chain: 18”L + 2” extender
  • Chain Type: Cable Link
  • Clasp: Lobster
  • Collection: Gemporia
  • Country of Origin: Poland

Please Note: Pendant CAN be removed from the chain.

About Compressed Gemstones

Compressed gemstones are a unique take on the more traditional single nugget gems or cabochons. Made from a collection of smaller gemstone nuggets like turquoise, coral or amber, they are added to a resin and compressed into blocks. Some compressed gems are dyed to enhance their color. The blocks are then sawed into slices, shaped as if they were one stone and set into a piece of jewelry.

All weights pertaining to gemstones, including diamonds, are minimum weights. Additionally, please note that many gemstones are treated to enhance their beauty. View Gemstone Enhancements and Special Care Requirements for important information.

SterlingSilver    Amber    

Sterling Silver

Sterling silver, also called fine silver, is a beautifully lustrous cool-toned precious metal favored in fine jewelry among other products. The most reflective of all metals (excluding mercury), sterling silver looks stunning by itself and brings out the best hues in an array of colorful gemstones.

Sterling silver can be polished to a higher sheen than platinum. In fact, Ag, the chemical symbol for silver, comes from a word that means “white and shining.” The surface of silver can boast that shiny, polished appearance, or can be brushed, satin, matte, sandblasted, antiqued or oxidized (chemically blackened).

In order to be called sterling silver, a metal must be made up of a minimum of 92.5% pure silver and 7.5% alloy (meaning other metals), including but not limited to copper and nickel. The alloy is added to pure silver to make the metal more durable, tougher and harder. Sterling silver is designated a fineness of “925.” Pieces with sterling silver may be marked “sterling.”

Finishes on Sterling Silver
Finishing, or plating, is a common treatment with sterling silver. Popular types of plating are rhodium plating, gold plating and anti-tarnish plating. Plating is used to extend the life and sheen of the jewelry. After sizing or buffing a piece of jewelry with a machine, it must be re-plated to restore the finish.

  • Rhodium Plating: Rhodium plating is a complex and laborious process that enhances the luster and beauty and extends the life of silver. A member of the platinum metal group, rhodium is often used as a finishing touch on silver jewelry. It's a shiny silvery metal with a very white and reflective appearance, much like mercury. It's also very hard, so it withstands much wear and tear, resists natural tarnishing and wonderfully mimics the brilliant finish of freshly polished silver.

    Caring for Sterling Silver
    Sterling silver becomes tarnished as the result of a natural chemical process that occurs when sterling silver is exposed to chemicals in the air, rubber, wool and latex. Humidity also plays a role in accelerating tarnishing. It's easy to keep your sterling silver sparkling, though, by taking a few steps to prevent tarnish and other wear and tear.

  • Avoid exposing sterling silver to direct sunlight and harsh chemicals, including chlorine, ammonia, hair products, perfumes, cosmetics, perspiration and strong jewelry cleaning solutions.
  • Periodically wash sterling silver with mild dish soap and warm water. Rinse well and dry completely with a soft cloth before storing because moisture can cause tarnish.
  • Lightly polish sterling silver frequently with a soft silver-polishing cloth, avoiding abrasive cloths completely.
  • Tarnish is easy to remove when it first forms as a yellowish tint, but becomes more difficult to remove when it becomes brown and black. Remove tarnish with a silver polish cream, avoiding immersing pieces with gemstones in tarnish-removal solutions.
  • Minimize scratches on sterling silver by storing it in its own compartment in your jewelry box or in a cloth pouch. Sterling silver may also be stored in sealed polyethylene bags.

    Amber
    Amber is fossilized resin from ancient plants, especially coniferous trees. Tens of millions of years ago, if the conditions were right, this sticky resin would become encased in earth and gradually become fossilized. Resin that has not completely fossilized is called copal.

    Sometimes leaves, bits of wood, and even the whole bodies of insects would be trapped along with the resin. Pieces of amber with the intact remains of ancient insects or other small organisms are rare and highly valued. More than 1,000 extinct species have been identified in amber.

    Jewelry and History
    Amber is translucent and range in color from dark brown to a light lemon yellow. It is very soft, with a hardness of 2.5 on the Mohs Scale, and it can be scratched easily. Jewelry with amber cabochons should be worn with care to prevent damage to the stones.

    Amber has been used as jewelry for thousands of years. Homer mentions amber jewelry—earrings and a necklace of amber beads—as a princely gift in The Odyssey. Amber can be burned, and this produces a strong aroma the ancient Germans used as incense; they called it bernstein, or “burn stone.” Clear, colorless amber was considered the best material for rosary beads in the Middle Ages due to its smooth, silky feel.

    Today, two main sources of amber are the Baltic Sea and the Dominican Republic. Amber from the Baltic states is older, but amber from the Dominican Republic is more likely to have insect inclusions.

  • About the Collection
    Feel great about amazing style with jewelry from Gemporia. Founder Steve Bennett created Gemporia as a way to bring beautiful, high-quality gemstone jewelry to digital customers while lifting the veil on the entire gemstone industry. By forging strong relationships with mines and jewelers around the world, Gemporia is able to be first to market with new gemstones at an incredible value to their customers. This groundbreaking approach has solidified them as a true leader in the gemstone industry while also allowing them to educate shoppers. Each brilliantly cut Gemporia stone is meticulously set in either sterling silver or 14 karat gold and showcased in one of their clean, modern designs. Beyond providing customers with great value, their unique business model helps improve the lives of mine workers and their communities so you can feel great about looking amazing.

    Gemporia
    Pretty. Amazing.

    Jake ThompsonAbout the Guest
    Gemstone investor Jake Thompson travels the globe sourcing quality gemstones and forging relationships with mining and cutting communities all over the world. By utilizing this unique network, Jake is able to acquire parcels of rare gemstones and the latest discoveries before most are even aware they exist at a fraction of the price. Focusing on this direct mine to market approach, the value offered to collectors from these parcels is revolutionizing the gemstone jewelry landscape.