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Bruno Magli Women's Mira Link Watch Bracelet

Decorate your wrist with the gleam of this beautiful Mira link bracelet by Bruno Magli. Whether you’ve found their watches and fallen in love with their effortless style or you simply are looking for the perfect shining accent to complete an outfit for a night out, this bracelet is absolutely a must-have!

Bracelet Details

  • Bracelet: Brass
  • Bracelet Measurements: 7" L x 16mm W
  • Clasp: Hinged
  • Bracelet Country of Origin: China

    Warranty: Two-year limited warranty. For warranty support, please call 718-437-8723.

    Please Note: Bracelet does not come with watch.

Bracelets    Upto7inches    Straps    Link    
Bracelet Clasp Types
A clasp is more than a practical device used to fasten your jewelry. It is part of the overall design and can be a very important focal point. Be sure to consider if it will suit your needs of durability, fashion, comfort and peace of mind.

Barrel Clasp: Used on most rope chains to make the chain more secure. The barrel clasp looks like part of the chain and twists to get a pendant on and off.

Lobster Claw Clasp: As a traditional clasp style found in bracelets and necklaces, the lobster claw is generally reserved for heavier styles that may need added strength. The closure's shape is more oblong, similar to a teardrop shape, and is controlled by a tip that opens and closes the spring in the clasp. This type is also considered a more expensive finding that can add to the overall value of the jewelry piece.

Magnetic Clasp: The popularity of the magnetic clasp has greatly increased in recent years. It is a quick and easy way to secure jewelry while not having to fuss with a tiny clasp, which can be difficult if you have long fingernails, arthritic hands or other mobility challenges. A magnetic clasp relies on a strong internal magnet that works to pull both ends of the clasp together. In most cases, a magnetic clasp is used for light to medium weight jewelry pieces that do not put excessive stress on the magnet.

S-Clasp: An S-shaped piece of metal that connects a chain by hooking metal rings on each end of the S-shape.

Slide Insert Clasp: This type of clasp is exactly as it sounds. With a box-like shape that is hollow on the inside, the wearer will slide the nearly-flat tab into the box until it clicks, indicating a secure closure. On some jewelry, a slide insert clasp will be accompanied by a side safety catch, which adds strength and security to the clasp. Although this type of clasp is found on both bracelets and necklaces, it is particularly popular on bracelet styles. These types of clasps are often reserved for more expensive jewelry.

Spring Ring Clasp: One of the most common closure types, the spring ring clasp is typically used for light to medium weight bracelets or necklaces. It is round in its design and features a small tip which controls the opening and closing of the spring. The circle then closes around another smaller loop or link at the other end of the strand.

Toggle Clasp: A toggle clasp is a narrow piece of metal, usually designed in the shape of a bar, which is then pushed through a circular ring to act as a fastener. Unlike the lobster claw or spring ring clasps, a toggle clasp is not controlled by a spring. The pretty design is less secure than other closure types, but is usually meant to be a big part of the design and is meant to "show". The clasp is an attractive way to secure a chunkier link bracelet or necklace.

Bracelet Sizing
To measure for a bracelet, wrap a soft, flexible tape measure around your wrist bone. Then, add 3/4" to 1" to that measurement to determine your bracelet size. Generally, 7" is considered a standard women's size and 8" is considered a standard men's size.

Another way to get an ideal fit is to measure the length of a bracelet you own. For bracelets that are to be slipped over the hand, measure the widest part of your hand to ensure the bracelet will fit over it.

Keep in mind that different bracelet styles tend to fit differently depending upon the clasp and materials used. Bracelets with adjustable clasps are usually one size fits all. Those with large beads or stones have less room for your wrist. Also, bracelets with links can usually be shortened by removing one or more links.

Bracelet Clasp Types
A clasp is more than a practical device used to fasten your jewelry. It is part of the overall design and can be a very important focal point. Be sure to consider if it will suit your needs of durability, fashion, comfort and peace of mind.

Barrel Clasp: Used on most rope chains to make the chain more secure. The barrel clasp looks like part of the chain and twists to get a pendant on and off.

Lobster Claw Clasp: As a traditional clasp style found in bracelets and necklaces, the lobster claw is generally reserved for heavier styles that may need added strength. The closure's shape is more oblong, similar to a teardrop shape, and is controlled by a tip that opens and closes the spring in the clasp. This type is also considered a more expensive finding that can add to the overall value of the jewelry piece.

Magnetic Clasp: The popularity of the magnetic clasp has greatly increased in recent years. It is a quick and easy way to secure jewelry while not having to fuss with a tiny clasp, which can be difficult if you have long fingernails, arthritic hands or other mobility challenges. A magnetic clasp relies on a strong internal magnet that works to pull both ends of the clasp together. In most cases, a magnetic clasp is used for light to medium weight jewelry pieces that do not put excessive stress on the magnet.

S-Clasp: An S-shaped piece of metal that connects a chain by hooking metal rings on each end of the S-shape.

Slide Insert Clasp: This type of clasp is exactly as it sounds. With a box-like shape that is hollow on the inside, the wearer will slide the nearly-flat tab into the box until it clicks, indicating a secure closure. On some jewelry, a slide insert clasp will be accompanied by a side safety catch, which adds strength and security to the clasp. Although this type of clasp is found on both bracelets and necklaces, it is particularly popular on bracelet styles. These types of clasps are often reserved for more expensive jewelry.

Spring Ring Clasp: One of the most common closure types, the spring ring clasp is typically used for light to medium weight bracelets or necklaces. It is round in its design and features a small tip which controls the opening and closing of the spring. The circle then closes around another smaller loop or link at the other end of the strand.

Toggle Clasp: A toggle clasp is a narrow piece of metal, usually designed in the shape of a bar, which is then pushed through a circular ring to act as a fastener. Unlike the lobster claw or spring ring clasps, a toggle clasp is not controlled by a spring. The pretty design is less secure than other closure types, but is usually meant to be a big part of the design and is meant to "show". The clasp is an attractive way to secure a chunkier link bracelet or necklace.

Bracelet Sizing
To measure for a bracelet, wrap a soft, flexible tape measure around your wrist bone. Then, add 3/4" to 1" to that measurement to determine your bracelet size. Generally, 7" is considered a standard women's size and 8" is considered a standard men's size.

Another way to get an ideal fit is to measure the length of a bracelet you own. For bracelets that are to be slipped over the hand, measure the widest part of your hand to ensure the bracelet will fit over it.

Keep in mind that different bracelet styles tend to fit differently depending upon the clasp and materials used. Bracelets with adjustable clasps are usually one size fits all. Those with large beads or stones have less room for your wrist. Also, bracelets with links can usually be shortened by removing one or more links.

Strap Sizes:

  • Width - Measured where the strap meets the case
  • Length - Measured end to end, including the case, but not the buckle/closure
  • Alligator Straps:
    Alligator is the crème de la crème hide of the crocodilian species. Found in southern parts of the United States and in areas of China, alligators have a hide that is supple, durable and typically softer than crocodile. While its top hide is extremely tough and virtually impenetrable, the alligator's belly offers softer, pliable leather. It is easily recognized for its unique scaled texture and elegant feel. Alligators have scales that are relatively flat with a few wrinkles around the edge. If you see many lines or dots in the scales, or notice a drastic change in the adjacency of scales, you are probably looking at caiman hide, a crocodilian counterpart. Every alligator skin is different which means that no two leathers will ever be identical. Alligator leather is often dyed and easily cleaned with a damp washcloth.

    Crocodile Straps:
    Crocodiles possess a sensory organ on each of their scales that allows them to live in both fresh and salt water. This sensory receptor explains why their hides display a small dot on each scale and allows us to decipher them from alligators. Crocodile hide is also notably lighter in color than its alligator counterpart. Today, crocodiles are bred and harvested for both their skin and meat, so little goes to waste. Their hide is waterproof, easy to clean and holds its gloss beautifully over time.

    Leather Straps:
    Commonly acquired from cattle, leather is animal skin that is typically a byproduct of the nation's meat industry. Animals such as bison, deer, elk, moose, pigs, goats, rabbits, sheep and caribou can also be used. Once the skin is removed from the animal, it is quickly preserved in salt. It is then cleaned, put into a chilling machine to lower the hide's temperature, and tanned to prevent deterioration. Upon completion of this process, the leather is ready to be made into retail items. Leather goods are strong, flexible, supple and long lasting.

    Lizard Straps:
    Lizard skin is comprised of small, glossy scales in a variety of colors. It is durable and will remain so if treated properly. To keep your lizard skin looking its best, you should first determine which direction the scales move. When running your hands over the scales, it should feel smooth. Be careful to avoid running them in the opposite direction, as you'll give them an unattractive, flaking quality. For this reason, when applying conditioners, do so with the grain of the scales. Lizard hide is tough by nature and it will remain in good condition for many years with minimal maintenance.

    Ostrich Straps:
    Redeemed for its exceptionally supple, slightly oily coat, premium ostrich leather is a true luxury. Its distinct appearance comes from thick quill pattern that covers half its body. Because the tanning process is so tedious and difficult, it requires great patience to cure a flawless ostrich hide. The ideal texture is smooth, soft, consistent in thickness and free from holes. Even color and finish are important indications of a good hide. Generally farm raised in places like South Africa, ostrich skin uniquely gets softer as time passes. Durable, resilient, pliable, breathable and yet naturally waterproof, ostrich hide upholds an opulent, exotic appearance and is an increasingly desirable leather used in high-end fashion houses.

    Rubber Straps:
    Originally harvested by the Aztecs and Mayans thousands of years ago, natural rubber comes from the sap of wild rubber trees native to Central and South America. It is collected manually by tapping, or cutting into their bark, to free the white sap known as latex. The latex is then shipped to factories where machines make it into everyday products. Highly valued for being waterproof, polyurethane rubber is an exceptionally strong form that conveniently absorbs color. It withstands abrasive environmental forces and is UV resistant, thus making it ideal for watches that will see a variety of surroundings.

    Sharkskin Leather Straps:
    Distinguished by its distinct texture and durability, sharkskin leather is usually dyed to highlight the round, closely-set pattern of textured scales. Each leather is completely unique with variations resulting from the age, species and size of the shark. As one of the strongest yet flexible leathers known to man, it is perfect for everyday items that experience continuous wear and tear.

    Snakeskin Straps:
    Whether anaconda, cobra, sea snake or python, snakeskin is all the rage when it comes to accessories. Due to the vast variety used, their unique textures and patterns vary greatly. Snakes have more visible scales than lizards. Their scales are comprised of keratin, just like human fingernails, and protect the skin, prevent water loss and enable the snake to move fluidly. When touching or treating snakeskin goods, be sure to run your hands in the direction of the scale's grain to prevent flaking.

    Stingray Straps:
    Stingray skin is amazingly durable and easily resists fire, water, puncturing and ripping. Centuries ago, the stingray was thought to possess great strength and its power was believed to be transmitted to anyone who touched it. Thus, Egyptian artisans created armor and other goods from the skin. Elite Japanese Samurai warriors even used durable stingray leather for the handles of their swords. A genuine stingray hide is extremely durable, shines in the light, and has a rough, yet glistening bead texture.

    Necklace & Bracelet Clasp Types


    A clasp is more than a practical device used to fasten your jewelry. It is part of the overall design and can be a very important focal point. Be sure to consider if it will suit your needs of durability, fashion, comfort and peace of mind.

    Lobster Claw Clasp: As a traditional clasp style found in bracelets and necklaces, the lobster claw is generally reserved for heavier styles that may need added strength. The closure's shape is more oblong, similar to a teardrop shape, and is controlled by a tip that opens and closes the spring in the clasp. This type is also considered a more expensive finding that can add to the overall value of the jewelry piece.

    Magnetic Clasp: The popularity of the magnetic clasp has greatly increased in recent years. It is a quick and easy way to secure jewelry while not having to fuss with a tiny clasp, which can be difficult if you have long fingernails, arthritic hands or other mobility challenges. A magnetic clasp relies on a strong internal magnet that works to pull both ends of the clasp together. In most cases, a magnetic clasp is used for light to medium weight jewelry pieces that do not put excessive stress on the magnet.

    Slide Insert Clasp: This type of clasp is exactly as it sounds. With a box-like shape that is hollow on the inside, the wearer will slide the nearly-flat tab into the box until it clicks, indicating a secure closure. On some jewelry, a slide insert clasp will be accompanied by a side safety catch, which adds strength and security to the clasp. Although this type of clasp is found on both bracelets and necklaces, it is particularly popular on bracelet styles. These types of clasps are often reserved for more expensive jewelry.

    Spring Ring Clasp: One of the most common closure types, the spring ring clasp is typically used for light to medium weight bracelets or necklaces. It is round in its design and features a small tip which controls the opening and closing of the spring. The circle then closes around another smaller loop or link at the other end of the strand.

    Toggle Clasp: A toggle clasp is a narrow piece of metal, usually designed in the shape of a bar, which is then pushed through a circular ring to act as a fastener. Unlike the lobster claw or spring ring clasps, a toggle clasp is not controlled by a spring. The pretty design is less secure than other closure types, but is usually meant to be a big part of the design and is meant to "show". The clasp is an attractive way to secure a chunkier link bracelet or necklace.

    About the Collection
    Bruno Magli (pronounced "Molly") is a classic Italian luxury brand that has been a symbol for quality footwear, specializing in Italian leather shoes. They have created refined, elegant designs with impeccable craftsmanship.
    Celebrating 8 decades of Italian history, Bruno Magli continues to evolve its heritage by reinventing luxury essentials for a new generation. Priding itself on a dedication to quality and innovation, the premier Bruno Magli watch line comes with an authentic Swiss movement as well as the finest genuine Italian leather straps.

    Rick GordonAbout the Guest
    Rick Gordon, an avid shoe aficionado, has been connected to the Bruno Magli line of luxury goods as a consumer for the better part of his adult life. It was only natural that when Bruno introduced their line of fine timepieces, Rick's other passion, that he teamed up with them in his role of Director - Business Development. Rick continues to drive the knowledge and exuberance of the Bruno Magli brand through every project and interaction he has.