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Timex Women's Health Tracker Digital Quartz Silicone Strap Sport Watch

As cute as it is functional! Acheive your goals of a healthy lifestyle with help from this health tracker and watch! With a lovely floral motif, the Timex Health Tracker watch will be your new motivator as it features elapsed time, distance, and exercise pace intensity in real time. It also includes a countdown timer with countdown/stop and countdown/repeat, three alarms with Daily/Weekday/Weekend/Weekly options and a handy five-minute backup function. Last but not least, you can set functions in two different time zones. And don't be overwhelmed - built-in setting reminders make setting the watch quick and easy.

Details:
  • Movement: Digital Quartz
  • Movement Country of Origin: China
  • Case Measurements: 37mm
  • Case Thickness: 15mm
  • Crystal: Mineral
  • Crown: Push/Pull w/ Function Pushers
  • Strap: Silicone
  • Bracelet Measurements: 7.5" L x 20mm W
  • Clasp: Buckle
  • Water Resistance: 5 ATM - 50 Meters - 165 Feet
  • Warranty: One year manufacturer warranty. Please call TG Service Center at 1-800-448-4639.
  • Watch Country of Origin: Philippines

Check out the Watch Sizing Guide to view the actual case size.

Watches
Model Number Blue: T5K484
Model Number Grey: T5K485
Model Number Black: T5K486
UPC 753048372560
UPC 753048372577
UPC 753048372584
Watch Glossary:

ATM: Measures water resistance; Stands for "atmospheres" or the amount of pressure a watch can withstand before leaking; One atmosphere is equal to 10 meters of water pressure.

Bezel: Retaining ring topping the case and securing the crystal; Sometimes incorporates unidirectional or ratcheting movements, engraved or printed chapter markers, or complications such as a tachymeter.

Chronograph: Functioning similarly to a stopwatch, a chronograph is a unique and valued complication due to its ability to measure increments of elapsed time while the watch still maintains traditional timekeeping abilities. The crown controls the analog watch while function pushers allow you to start, stop and reset the chronograph subdials.

Chronometer: High-precision timepiece that has been tested and is certified to meet precision standards; Chronometer watches often come with certificates indicating their certified status.

Complication: Any feature added to the timepiece that does not indicate hours, minutes or seconds.

COSC Certified Chronometer: Refers to timepieces that have been christened with the title of chronometer. To become a chronometer, timepieces have to pass a test conducted by the Controle Officiel Suisse des Chronometers (COSC), roughly translating to Official Swiss Chronometer Testing Institute. COSC is a prestigious Swiss government agency that certifies the accuracy and precision of timepieces in Switzerland.

Crown: Part that allows you to manipulate the watch movement for a variety of purposes such as setting the hands, changing the date, winding the mainspring, etc.

Crystal: Transparent cover on a watch face that gives view of the dial.

Deployant: Type of clasp that keeps the closing mechanism hidden, creating an uninterrupted look for your bracelet or strap.

Dual Time Zone: Timepiece that simultaneously gives time in two time zones. GMT function serves the same purpose and is used interchangeably, as it can be set to any time zone you wish.

Exhibition Case or Back: Unique complication wherein a crystal window is implemented into the back of a watch case, allowing view of the timepiece's movement.

Function Pushers: Manual controls on a case for when a movement features complications that require increased manipulation.

Greenwich Mean Time (GMT): Also referred to as Greenwich Meridian Time, the Greenwich Meridian Line is located at the Royal Observatory in Greenwich, England. It is the place from where all time zones are measured. Greenwich Mean Time is the average time that Earth takes to rotate from noon to noon. In this regard, GMT is thought of as "the world's time" and was once the basis with which every other zone set time.

Guilloche: Style of engraving that features wavy or straight lines, giving a unique effect when the timepiece is moved or shifted.

Ionic Plating: Process that produces a hardened surface that is durable and scratch-resistant; Has a black flat "stealth" finish.

Jewels: Within a movement, metal on metal contact creates wear and tear. Watchmakers use jewel bearings to reduce friction and help the delicate parts of the movement work smoothly and with great precision. Jewels help extend the movement's life. Diamonds, sapphires, rubies and garnets are the preferred materials. As a general rule, a higher number of jewels suggests a more prestigious movement.

Lugs: North and south ends of the case that attach to the strap or bracelet and often extend out from the dominant lines of the case.

Moon Phase: The lunar cycle has been a cornerstone of horology, the study of measuring time, since ancient days. Moon Phase is a complication on a timepiece that displays the various stages of the moon cycles from waxing to waning. It appears as a dial visible through an aperture which reveals the current moon phase.

Movement: Assembly making up the principal elements and mechanisms of a watch or clock; Includes the winding and setting mechanism, the mainspring, the train, the escapement and the regulating elements.

Power Reserve: Time a watch will continue running based on the movement's residual winding of its mainspring; In quartz and digital watches, this can also refer to the amount of energy left in the battery.

Push Button Dual Deployant: Similar to deployant and considered one of the most desirable and easy-to-use clasps, the push button dual deployant employs two small hidden push buttons that release the bracelet. This clasp keeps the closing mechanism hidden for an uninterrupted, seamless finish.

Repeater: Complex watch mechanism that sounds hours, quarters or minutes, or repeats them on request; Originally designed to help the wearer to tell the time in the dark.

Retrograde: Hour, minute, second or calendar hand that moves across a scale and resets to zero at the end of its cycle.

Skeletonization: Reveals the intricate symphony of moving rotors, gears and springs which power a timepiece; The open design offers an insider's view, as unnecessary metal is cut away to allow the wearer to actually see the movement's skeleton.

Swiss Made: Since the 16th century, Switzerland has been the epicenter of watch making, producing some of the industry's greatest technological advances. The Swiss put a law into effect for all timepieces baring the words "Swiss Made": First, the movement must be assembled in Switzerland. Secondly, the movement must be cased up in Switzerland. Finally, the manufacturer must carry out the timepiece's final inspection in Switzerland.

Tachymeter: Scale on a watch used to determine units per hour, such as average speed over a fixed distance, or distance based on speed; Typically located along the outer rim of a dial.

Tritium: Miniature tubes containing gaseous Tritium and layered with phosphor to power the luminous accents which can be seen for several meters in darkness. Tritium illumination requires no electrical power but must be "charged" by holding your watch close to any light source. The longer you hold it there, the longer and brighter you'll see the Tritnite.

Unidirectional Rotating Bezel: Used for tracking elapsed time. A ratchet mechanism prevents the bezel from rotating backwards. This feature is popular with divers, who rely on the elapsed time feature to prevent the diver from running out of air. The fact that the bezel cannot rotate backwards prevents the wearer from underestimating the elapsed time.

Quartz: Although not as mechanically complex as other engines, the quartz movement provides the most accurate and reliable time-keeping. This type of movement typically draws power from a battery and centers around a small vibrating chip of quartz crystal. When an electrical current, supplied from a battery, is applied to a quartz crystal, the current is distorted and creates a precise resonating frequency. Watchmakers employ the subsequent frequency to measure time. Some adaptations to the traditional quartz movement include introducing rotors and power cells in an effort to maintain the accuracy of quartz while eliminating the need for a battery. Quartz movements have been used in timepieces since the 1970s and are highly accurate, dependable and affordable.

Heart Rate Monitoring

Why Monitor Heart Rate?
Whether you are seeking to lose weight, increase endurance or build cardio fitness, monitoring your heart rate is instrumental in tracking the intensity of your workout and can help you make adjustments to your routine. There are a number of options to measure your heart rate including wearing a chest strap, a watch, or simply employing a self-monitoring technique.

The monitor choices in the market today range everywhere between models that are "no frills" to "techno geek" technology. The main appeal of a heart rate strap or watch is that you don't have to stop your routine to check your heart rate. It also shows your heart rate in real time and allows you to adjust your workout intensity accordingly. Monitoring yourself is quite simple, however. It's free and you don't have to worry about wearing a monitor everywhere you go!

What is Heart Rate?
Heart rate is the number of heart beats or contractions per unit of time, usually measured in minutes. It is commonly expressed as bpm or beats per minute. Heart rate fluctuates according to the body's requirement for oxygen and, depending on activity, can vary 10 beats per minute on an average day. Two significant fluctuations occur during exercise (highest bpm) and sleep (lowest bpm). For most adults, the ideal is between 60-100 bpm. Professional athletes are reported to have resting heart rates of 40-60 bpm.

Checking Your Heart Rate
There are several acceptable locations to check your heart rate. However, the carotid artery in the neck and the radial artery on the wrist are the most practical for self-monitoring your bpm at rest and during exercise. Your carotid artery runs vertically on each side of your neck. Using your dominant hand, place your fingers on the opposite side of your neck. You should feel a pulse under your jaw, at the half-point mark between your earlobe and chin. You can find the radial artery (wrist) about two to three fingers' distance from the bottom of your thumb. It will be located between the tendons that run through your forearm.

Be sure to use your index and middle finger pads to locate the spot. You can take your bpm for a full minute, but the easiest method is to take your heart beat for 15 seconds and then multiply the number of beats times four (60 seconds = 1 minute).

Your Resting Heart Rate
If you desire to monitor your heart beat to track athletic performance, first start with your resting heart rate. Resting heart rate is defined as the beats per minute when you are at complete rest. It is recommended that you check your heart rate soon after you wake up, before getting out of bed.

Physical or emotional fluctuations can affect your heart rate, so keep in mind that needing to use the restroom, extreme emotions like stress or anger, quality of sleep, and quality of diet (use of caffeine, sugar or other stimulants) can elevate your resting heart rate.

To accurately determine your average resting heart rate, take your bpm for five consecutive days and calculate the average (by adding all five days' heart rates, then dividing by five). Your resting heart rate can also indicate your basic fitness level. When you are more fit and conditioned, it takes your heart fewer beats per minute to pump blood to your body. Continue to monitor your resting heart rate and compare it to the 60-100 bpm range. You can keep a journal to track your progress indicated by a decrease in bpm, demonstrating that the more you work out, your heart will become more efficient.

Finding Your Target Heart Rate Zone
In order to determine your target heart rate for exercising, you must first find your age-adjusted maximum heart rate. Maximum heart rate is defined by the highest number of times your heart can beat per minute. The most accurate way to determine your maximum heart rate is in a medical facility monitored by a cardiologist. However, you can also project your age-adjusted maximum heart rate by using a standard formula that subtracts your age from 220. Then, to determine your target heart rate for exercising, you simply multiply your age-adjusted maximum heart rate by your desired Target Zone percentage (below).

Example: If you are 40 years old and looking for a workout with an intensity level of Light Exercise, multiply your age-adjusted maximum heart rate by 0.50 or 0.60 (according to the Target Zone percentages below).

  • 220 – 40 = 180 (180 is your age-adjusted maximum heart rate)
  • 180 x 0.50 = 90
  • 180 x 0.60 = 108
    Your target heart rate should be between 90-108 bpm during your workout.

    Target Zones (also known as Intensity Levels)
    The target heart rate zones are the variable intensity levels recommended to reap specific cardio results from your workout. The typical range for the most beneficial cardiovascular health is between 50-80% of your maximum heart rate.

    50-60% - Light Exercise (moderate activity, including warm up)
    60-70% - Weight Management (weight control, fat burn)
    70-80% - Aerobic / Cardio (training and endurance)
    80-90% - Aerobic Endurance (anerobic and hardcore training)
    90-100% - Athlete (maximum effort)

    Please note, it is always recommended to consult a physician before you start any workout regimen to determine the correct workout intensity for your age, current physical condition and desired results.

    The case provides the foundation for all other major watch components. It houses the movement, maintains the lugs for attachment to the bracelet or strap, plays host to various crowns and function pushers, and seats the crystal and bezel.

    Cases exist in a variety of shapes and sizes and utilize a library of materials for construction such as stainless steel, gold, ceramic, titanium, plastic, and more. The dominance of stainless steel in case construction remains, however, hypo-allergenic metals and materials, like titanium, continue to gain in popularity. Metal cases often have particular finishes - such as a smooth reflective polish or circular matte brush - that enhance the presentation of the timepiece and give it unique depth.

    Some designs allow for the case and lugs to be curved in order for the watch to have a more comfortable fit around the wrist. The back of a case will typically be removable and most likely be screw down or pop-off. It is important to note, however, it should only be opened by a trained professional. An exhibition feature (found within a case's back) refers to an added window that allows you to view the movement and is often found on automatic and mechanical timepieces.

    Case Size:
    Case measurements do not include crown or lugs.

  • Round - One measurement, 8:00 to 2:00
  • Square - One measurement, 3:00 to 9:00 or 6:00 to 12:00 (should be the same)
  • Rectangle, Tonneau, Oval, Octagon, etc. - Two measurements, 3:00 to 9:00 and 6:00 to 12:00
  • Watch Case Dimension Comparisons:
    It can be difficult to determine how a watch will fit on your wrist without trying it on first. Get a better feel for the size of a watch case by comparing the case diameter to the following diameters of common objects:
  • Nickel: 21.21mm
  • Quarter: 24.26mm
  • Half Dollar: 30.61mm
  • Poker Chip (standard): 39mm
  • Ping Pong Ball: 40mm
  • Golf Ball: 42.67mm
  • Tow Ball Hitch (ISO standard): 50mm
  • Racquetball: 57mm
  • Soda Can (standard): 65mm
  • Tennis Ball: 67mm