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Waterford Crystal "6 Patterns of the Sea" 7.25" Fan Cut Ice Bucket

Explore the beaches and seaside towns of Ireland everytime you enjoy an ice-cold beverage! This incredible ice bucket is designed with six different patterns that are inspired by famous beaches in Ireland. All of Ireland's coasts are represented on this beautiful lead crystal ice bucket which can also double as a wine or champagne cooler. Cheers!

Six Patterns Of the Sea

  • Glengarriff - West Cork: Glengarriff is nestled in at the end of Bantry Bay and is one of the oldest tourist destinations in Ireland. Follow in the footsteps of Wordsworth, Thackeray and GB Shaw and discover the wonder of its natural beauty. A stunning location where ocean, river and ancient oak forest meet.
  • Rosslare - County Wexford: Rosslare Strand, or simply Rosslare, is a village and seaside resort in County Wexford, Ireland. The name Rosslare Strand is used to distinguish it from the nearby community of Rosslare Harbour, site of the Rosslare Europort.
  • Dunmore East - County Waterford: Dunmore East is a popular tourist, seaside and fishing village in County Waterford, Ireland. Situated on the west side of Waterford Harbour on Ireland's southeastern coast.
  • Tramore - County Waterford: Tramore is a seaside town in County Waterford on the southeast coast of Ireland. A small fishing village until the arrival of the railway in 1853, the town has continually expanded since.
  • Kinsale - County Cork: Kinsale is a historic port and fishing town in County Cork, Ireland, which also has significant military history.
  • Kenmare - County Kerry: Kenmare is a small town in the south of County Kerry, Ireland. The name Kenmare is the anglicised form of Ceann Mara meaning "head of the sea", referring to the head of Kenmare Bay.

Ice Bucket Details

  • Material: Lead Crystal
  • Dimensions: 7"L x 7"W x 7"-1/4"H
  • Weight: 6 lbs
  • Country of Origin: Slovenia

Please see the Care tab for important care instructions.

California residents only: “Proposition 65” WARNING

Proper Technique for Aerating & Decanting Your Wine
The purpose of letting wine breathe, or aerate, is maximizing your wine's exposure to the surrounding air. By allowing the wine to mix and mingle with air, it will typically warm up and the wine's aromas will open up, the flavor will soften a bit and the overall flavor characteristics should improve.

It is a common misconception that upon removing the cork, all bottles of wine need to be given time to breathe. This is not always the case. Not all wines require aeration. However, different wines require different amounts of time. Many wine sellers have experts that are educated on the wine they are selling so it's best to consult them regarding aeration time.

As soon as you open a bottle of wine, pour a small amount into your glass for a taste test. Wine is subjective in that there is no right or wrong flavor. If the wine is to your liking, then it's time to drink!

For wine that has aged for some time, a decanter is highly recommended. Many people simply open their bottle and let it sit. While adequate, it is not ideal. Decanting is a terrific technique for letting newer wines aerate and removing older wines' sediment. Sediment occurs in wine when pigments and tannins within the wine breakdown, leaving behind a harmless but bitter residue. Not only is sediment displeasing to the mouth, it's displeasing to the eye as well.

When decanting a wine with sediment, it's best to let the bottle stand upright, undisturbed for 24 hours. This allows the sediment to collect at the bottom of the bottle. After this allotted time, slowly pour your wine into a cleaned decanter. Observe the wine as it passes through the neck, stopping your pour upon the first sign of sediment.

The final result of this process leaves a decanter of pure wine and a bottle with some sediment-heavy wine left in it. While the remaining un-decanted wine may not taste the best, it makes a great addition to gravy or red sauces. Many wine enthusiasts pride themselves on their ability to find new and exciting uses for sediment-laden wine.

Proper decanting alters wine for the better, softening its bite and developing aromas and flavors more pleasing to the taste buds. Whether 100-years-old or one day, any bottle of wine will benefit from a decanter!

When washing by hand, avoid using scouring pads and/or abrasive detergents. To prevent spotting, combine a quarter cup ammonia with a mild lemon detergent. Clean bowls, vases and decanters by filling them half-full with moderately hot water, a small amount of mild detergent, two tablespoons of white vinegar or ammonia and 1/2 cup uncooked rice. Swirl the rice around for a few minutes to remove residue. Do not use an automatic dishwasher as this could cause your crystal to lose its brilliance. Rinse well with warm water and air dry.