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GPX® Portable 9" LCD Swivel Screen DVD/CD Player w/ Remote Control & Accessories

Staying entertained has never been so easy. The must-have GPX® Portable DVD/CD Player features a beautiful 9" LCD swivel screen and comes with everything you need to watch your favorite movies and shows. Whether you're relaxing at home, using it in the car with the included adapter, or even out on a camping adventure, you'll really enjoy having this convenient DVD player around!
What's Included
  • GPX® Portable 9" LCD Swivel Screen DVD/CD Player
  • Remote Control w/ Pre-Installed Battery
  • One Pair of Stereo Earbuds
  • AC/DC Power Adapter
  • 12V DC Car Adapter w/ Insert
  • Double Feature DVD ("Angel in Training" and "My Brother the Pig")
  • 3.5mm TRRRS Cable to Composite (2 x audio, 1 x video) Male Cable
  • Instructions

A Flexible Design
Ok - get this. The GPX® Portable 9" LCD Swivel Screen DVD/CD Player can be used a couple of different ways. Pull the screen upward to use view your movies in an upright position, or swivel the screen and push it back down to view them in a flat, hand held format. Two pairs of earbuds are included with the player, so that you may keep the DVD action all to yourself, or even listen to your favorite CDs when you're in the car or a room filled with other people.

Entertainment To Go!
The GPX® Portable 9" LCD Swivel Screen DVD/CD Player comes with a sleek carrying case, which is secured with a full zip-around closure. Elastic bands on the interior hold your DVD player into place, while the flap-over pocket on the front side gives you a place to stow your remote control, earbuds or various cords. Along with the top handle, a short adjustable strap and longer adjustable strap are included. They may be interchanged using their plastic push buckle closures.

Power Up
The built-in rechargeable Lithium-Polymer battery will give you up to four hours of entertainment before it needs to be recharged again. When you do need to refuel, you are able to use the AC/DC power adapter or the handy 12V DC car adapter, depending on where you are.

Click here to view a copy of the User Manual!

Additional Information
  • Inputs: One USB, One SD Memory Card and One Power
  • Outputs: One 3.5mm TRRRS (audio/video) and One 3.5mm Audio
  • TFT LCD Display: NTSC Video System
  • Built-in Stereo Speakers
  • 640 x 234 Native Resolution
  • 16:9 Aspect Ratio
  • Multi Language On-Screen Display
  • Buttons: Mute, Mode, Menu, Setup, FF, RW, Skip, OK, Play/Pause, Stop, Volume +/-, Open

Measurements
  • Dimensions: 1-3/4"H x 7-1/4"W x 9-1/2"D
  • Weight: 1.94 lbs
  • Made in China

Warranty- 90 day limited warranty provided by DPI (1-888-999-4215).
29Under    LCD    Portable    

Q. What different types of HDTVs are available and how do they compare to one another?
A. Rear Projection DLP, and Flat Panel LCD, Plasma and LED have their pros and cons.

Rear Projection (DLP)

  • Good to excellent picture quality
  • Sizes from 40" to 73"
  • Generally less expensive than flat panel TVs
  • Bigger, heavier, bulkier than LCD and plasma models
  • Flat Panel LCD

  • Excellent picture quality
  • Available in small screen sizes (under 32")
  • Can double as computer monitor
  • Thin, lightweight
  • Generally less expensive than plasma
  • Relatively narrow viewing angle
  • Pixel response can be slow, causing blurred motion, particularly when using the screen for video gaming or other high-demand activities
  • Flat Panel Plasma

  • Superior picture quality to LCD, though it is debatable
  • Screen sizes up to 70" or more
  • Thin, lightweight
  • Wide viewing angle; looks good from almost any angle
  • Faster pixel response; better for gaming and fast action sports
  • Generally more expensive than LCD
  • Slight risk of "burn-in", in which a static image becomes "burned" into the screen permanently
  • Q. What type of TVs use a lamp?
    A. Rear Projection DLP TVs use a lamp, with the typical lamp life ranging from 5,000 to 8,000 hours. With normal use, that translates to many years of TV viewing. You may never need to replace your DLP TV lamp (depending on how long you own the TV), but if you do, the typical replacement lamp costs around $200.

    Q. What is screen resolution?
    A. Resolution refers to the number of pixels being used to project an image. In general, the larger the numbers the better the resolution and the picture quality. Current HD programming tops out at 1920 x 1080 pixels. In fact, HD is generally about six times sharper than standard TV, and can be as much as ten times greater.

    Q. What's the difference between 720p, 1080p, and 1080i?
    A. 720 and 1080 refer to horizontal pixel counts. Both 1080p and 1080i HD broadcasts offer higher resolution than 720p broadcasts. The "i" indicates that the TV draws images using an interlaced method. The "p" indicates that the TV draws images using a progressive scan method. In general, progressive scan renders images faster and produces a more detailed, more film-like image. This means 1080p offers the highest quality currently available.

    Q. What do the "i" and "p" mean?
    A. The letters "p" and "i" indicate the picture-scanning method - progressive or interlaced. In interlaced scanning, the on-screen image is created in two split-second passes, drawing all the odd-numbered lines first then going back to fill in all the even-numbered lines. In contrast, progressive scanning draws each frame sequentially in a single pass to create a smoother, cleaner picture. So, progressive scanning is theoretically better than interlaced scanning.

    Q. What do I need to watch HD broadcasts?
    A. Your choices for watching HDTV are via over-the-air broadcasts, cable or digital satellite.

    Over-the-Air Broadcasts

  • HD-compatible TV
  • HDTV (ATSC / digital) tuner - separate unit or built into TV
  • Indoor or outdoor UHF or UHF/VHF antenna
  • Local HDTV broadcasts (free)
  • Cable HDTV

  • HD-compatible TV
  • HD-compatible cable box (or TV with built-in digital cable tuner: QAM or CableCARD-ready)
  • HD programming (subscription required)
  • Digital Satellite HDTV

  • HD-compatible TV
  • HD-compatible satellite receiver
  • HD-compatible satellite dish
  • HD programming (subscription required)
  • Q. What's the difference between a "3D-ready" and a "3D-capable" TV?
    A. 3D-ready TVs come with the necessary emitter built-in; 3D-capable TVs do not, so you'll need to add on a separate one for 3D-capable TVs.

    Q. What do I need to watch 3DTV at home?
    A. You'll need a TV labeled "3D-ready" or "3D-capable", a pair of 3D glasses for each person watching, and a 3D video source such as a 3D Blu-ray movie.

    Q. What different types of HDTVs are available and how do they compare to one another?
    A. Rear Projection DLP, and Flat Panel LCD, Plasma and LED have their pros and cons.

    Rear Projection (DLP)

  • Good to excellent picture quality
  • Sizes from 40" to 73"
  • Generally less expensive than flat panel TVs
  • Bigger, heavier, bulkier than LCD and plasma models
  • Flat Panel LCD

  • Excellent picture quality
  • Available in small screen sizes (under 32")
  • Can double as computer monitor
  • Thin, lightweight
  • Generally less expensive than plasma
  • Relatively narrow viewing angle
  • Pixel response can be slow, causing blurred motion, particularly when using the screen for video gaming or other high-demand activities
  • Flat Panel Plasma

  • Superior picture quality to LCD, though it is debatable
  • Screen sizes up to 70" or more
  • Thin, lightweight
  • Wide viewing angle; looks good from almost any angle
  • Faster pixel response; better for gaming and fast action sports
  • Generally more expensive than LCD
  • Slight risk of "burn-in", in which a static image becomes "burned" into the screen permanently
  • Q. What type of TVs use a lamp?
    A. Rear Projection DLP TVs use a lamp, with the typical lamp life ranging from 5,000 to 8,000 hours. With normal use, that translates to many years of TV viewing. You may never need to replace your DLP TV lamp (depending on how long you own the TV), but if you do, the typical replacement lamp costs around $200.

    Q. What is screen resolution?
    A. Resolution refers to the number of pixels being used to project an image. In general, the larger the numbers the better the resolution and the picture quality. Current HD programming tops out at 1920 x 1080 pixels. In fact, HD is generally about six times sharper than standard TV, and can be as much as ten times greater.

    Q. What's the difference between 720p, 1080p, and 1080i?
    A. 720 and 1080 refer to horizontal pixel counts. Both 1080p and 1080i HD broadcasts offer higher resolution than 720p broadcasts. The "i" indicates that the TV draws images using an interlaced method. The "p" indicates that the TV draws images using a progressive scan method. In general, progressive scan renders images faster and produces a more detailed, more film-like image. This means 1080p offers the highest quality currently available.

    Q. What do the "i" and "p" mean?
    A. The letters "p" and "i" indicate the picture-scanning method - progressive or interlaced. In interlaced scanning, the on-screen image is created in two split-second passes, drawing all the odd-numbered lines first then going back to fill in all the even-numbered lines. In contrast, progressive scanning draws each frame sequentially in a single pass to create a smoother, cleaner picture. So, progressive scanning is theoretically better than interlaced scanning.

    Q. What do I need to watch HD broadcasts?
    A. Your choices for watching HDTV are via over-the-air broadcasts, cable or digital satellite.

    Over-the-Air Broadcasts

  • HD-compatible TV
  • HDTV (ATSC / digital) tuner - separate unit or built into TV
  • Indoor or outdoor UHF or UHF/VHF antenna
  • Local HDTV broadcasts (free)
  • Cable HDTV

  • HD-compatible TV
  • HD-compatible cable box (or TV with built-in digital cable tuner: QAM or CableCARD-ready)
  • HD programming (subscription required)
  • Digital Satellite HDTV

  • HD-compatible TV
  • HD-compatible satellite receiver
  • HD-compatible satellite dish
  • HD programming (subscription required)
  • Q. What's the difference between a "3D-ready" and a "3D-capable" TV?
    A. 3D-ready TVs come with the necessary emitter built-in; 3D-capable TVs do not, so you'll need to add on a separate one for 3D-capable TVs.

    Q. What do I need to watch 3DTV at home?
    A. You'll need a TV labeled "3D-ready" or "3D-capable", a pair of 3D glasses for each person watching, and a 3D video source such as a 3D Blu-ray movie.