Treasure Chest Coin Collection

Who knows what you’ll find? Your adventure arrives in an antiqued handmade wooden chest accented with polished brass fitting - a treasure in itself! Each chest measures 4-3/4" x 3-1/2" x 3". Comes with a certificate of authenticity and one-year limited warranty.

Classic Coin Set w/ Handmade Wooden Treasure Chest (51 Coins)
Share the thrill of hunting through unsearched coins discovered in a forgotten corner of America’s heartland. Imagine the fun of opening your own wooden chest filled with at least 50 old and intriguing coins! You’ll discover lots of Pure Copper Wheat Ear Pennies, World War II coins, Silver Mercury Dimes, Buffalo Nickels and more! Perhaps you’ll uncover a Indian Head Penny, maybe a Liberty Nickel, or possibly both!

Wooden Treasure Chest Coin Collection
This coin collection includes 100 of our favorite foreign coins in a beautiful wooden treasure chest. Old and new favorites from major-nation currencies and exotic countries. You'll find coins of unique shapes and beautiful designs, including animals, flowers and ships - with 200 obverse and reverse designs in all. Coins, Years & Mint Marks may vary.

1 lb. Lincoln Wheat Ear Pennies Treasure Chest
Open this treasure chest and find one pound of genuine Lincoln Wheat Ear pennies. The coin honors the 100th anniversary of Lincoln's birth and was the first American coin to bear the image of an actual person. Reverse design symbolizes US agricultural heritage. It is a U.S. coin minted from 1909 to 1958.

1943 Lincoln Steel Pennies Treasure Chest
Minted in anticipation of a copper shortage during World War II, these unique steel pennies minted in 1943 have stood the test of time. Now worth far more than face value, you get an assortment of 50 of these increasingly rare coins. This may be your last chance to obtain this many steel pennies at one time. Coins store in a wood treasure chest. It is a U.S. coin minted in 1943.

St. Nick's Treasure Chest
Legend says that one of first gifts given by Saint Nicholas was coins. St. Nick dropped coins down the chimney which landed into stockings hung to dry. Santa's elves packed each chest with a total of 35 coins, including a special Santa colorized Washington quarter, a US Golden Dollar, and coins from around the world. The chest also comes with a Merry Christmas translation and custom sheet.

Cents    Dimes    Nickels    OtherCoinsCollectibles    

Lincoln Cent:
The idea of striking an image of a past president on a circulating coin in the United States ignited a controversy in 1909. The act of honoring the 100th anniversary of Abraham Lincoln's birth by etching his likeness into the American cent directly violated a long-standing tradition in American coinage. Many believed that the custom established by George Washington of not using the images of presidents on circulating coins should be respected. Despite this resistance, the coin adopted the image of Lincoln and also the initials of the coin's designer, Victor D. Brenner. The relative prominence of the V.D.B. on the reverse of the coin led many to criticize the design. The initials were removed shortly thereafter but eventually returned in a more subtle form in 1918.

The coin debuted with a reverse featuring a pair of wheat ears encircling the words, "One Cent" and "United States of America". The term "Wheat Penny" derives from this reverse design. In 1959, to honor the 150th anniversary of Abraham Lincoln's birth, a new reverse, designed by noted U.S. Mint Engraver, Frank Gasparro, replaced the original. The new reverse displayed a striking image of the Lincoln Memorial surrounded by the words, "One Cent" and "United States of America." This reverse design remained on the penny until 2009 when four new reverse images were introduced to commemorate the 200th anniversary of Lincoln's birth and the 100th anniversary of the Lincoln Cent. The four designs each honored a different stage of Lincoln's life and were released one at a time every three months over the course of the year.

Mercury Dime:
First minted in 1916, this United States ten-cent piece features an image on the obverse of Lady Liberty wearing a winged Phrygian cap. The likeness drew comparisons to the Roman messenger god, Mercury, giving the coin its nickname. The cap Liberty wears has origins in ancient Greece and Rome and became a symbol of freedom used by revolutionaries in France and America during the late 18th century. The designer of the coin, Adolph Weinman, added wings to the sides of the cap to specifically call to mind freedom of thought.

The reverse of the Mercury dime features the fasces at the center supported by an olive branch. The fasces is an ancient Roman symbol of power and authority composed of rods arranged parallel and wrapped to the handle of an ax, while the olive branch is a traditional symbol of peace. The United States Mint struck the Mercury dime until the end of 1945. In 1946, John Sinnock's new design for the ten-cent coin honoring President Franklin Delano Roosevelt replaced the Mercury dime and continues today.

Buffalo Nickel:
The Buffalo Nickel was designed by James Earle Fraser and first minted in 1913. This extremely popular and legendary coin features the profile of a Native American man on the obverse and the image of a bison on a small hill on the reverse. Fraser revealed before his death that his depiction of the man on the obverse was a composite profile based upon Chief Iron Tail of the Lakota Sioux, Chief Two Moons of the Cheyenne, and possibly a third man. Although this third person was not specified by Fraser, many believe him to be Chief Big Tree of the Kiowa. The reverse design is thought to be an image of a famous bison at the time named Black Diamond, which lived at the New York Zoo.

The United States Mint produced the coin up until 1938 when it was replaced by Felix Schlag's portrait of Thomas Jefferson on the obverse and an image of the third President's home, Monticello, on the reverse. In 2006, James Earle Fraser's definitive work on the Buffalo Nickel was again used as the design for the new 24K gold American Buffalo coin. The U.S. Mint also struck a coin in 2001 featuring Fraser's famous Buffalo Nickel design to commemorate the opening of the National Museum of the American Indian in the Smithsonian Institution.

Coin Glossary:

Die: An engraved piece of metal used to stamp a design on a coin.

Die crack: A small, raised imperfection on a coin resulting from a crack in the stamping die.

Early release: The Numismatic Guaranty Corporation (NGC) uses this designation for U.S. Bullion Coins during the first month of release from the U.S. Mint. To qualify for Early Release designation, NGC must receive the coins within 30 days of their release by the US Mint or properly documented as being received by an NGC approved entity within the same 30-day release period.

Encapsulated coin: A coin graded and authenticated by a professional coin service, then sealed in plastic.

Field: The typically flat area surrounding the relief and not used for legend or inscription.

Legal tender: Official money issued by the government.

Legend: The coin's primary lettering.

Lettered edge: An inscription added to the edge of a coin.

Luster: The quality of the surface brilliance on a Mint State or Uncirculated coin.

Mercury dime: Issued from 1916 to 1945, this U.S. dime featured a representation of Liberty in a winged hat that was commonly mistaken for the ancient god, Mercury.

Mint: A government controlled coin production facility.

Mint mark: A small letter stamped on a coin that indicates its mint origin, ex. "D" for Denver.

Mint Set: One coin from each of the available denominations in a particular year, produced by a single mint and made for circulation.

Mint State (Uncirculated): A regular production coin never used in trade and existing in its original condition.

Mintage: The number of coins produced.

NGC: Numismatic Guaranty Corporation.

Numismatics: The collection and study of monetary objects such as coins and paper bills.

Obverse: Heads, or a coin's front side.

Patina: Surface discoloration, typically green or brown, caused by oxidation over time.

PCGS: Professional Coin Grading Service.

Planchet: A blank metal piece used to produce a coin.

Proof: Expertly polished planchets and dies produce these coins which feature an extremely high quality strike, resulting in unmatched detail and brilliant surface finish.

Reeded edge: A coin edge finish featuring parallel vertical grooves all the way around.

Relief: The raised portion of a stamped design that sits above the coin's field.

Reverse: Tails, or coin's back side.

Rim: The raised ring around the perimeter of a coin designed to reduce wear on the relief.

Strike: The act of stamping a coin.

Truncation: The bottom edge of a portrait or bust.

Wheat penny: Lincoln cents issued from 1909 to 1958 bearing the wheat ear design on the reverse.