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Armed Forces Colorized Quarter Pocket Knife Collection

An inspiring collectible celebrating our nation's Armed Forces.

U.S. Army Colorized Washington Quarter Collector’s Pocket Knife

The front of this knife’s wood-grain handle frames the Washington Quarter beautifully colorized with the Army emblem in the stars and stripes of a waving American flag.

U.S. Navy Colorized Washington Quarter Collector’s Pocket Knife

The front of this knife’s wood-grain handle frames the Washington Quarter beautifully colorized with the Navy emblem in the stars and stripes of a waving American flag.

U.S. Air Force Colorized Washington Quarter Collector’s Pocket Knife

The front of this knife’s wood-grain handle frames the Washington Quarter beautifully colorized with the Air Force emblem in the stars and stripes of a waving American flag.

U.S. Marines Colorized Washington Quarter Collector’s Pocket Knife

The front of this knife’s wood-grain handle frames the Washington Quarter beautifully colorized with the Marines emblem in the stars and stripes of a waving American flag.

U.S. Coast Guard Colorized Washington Quarter Collector’s Pocket Knife

The front of this knife’s wood-grain handle frames the Washington Quarter beautifully colorized with the Navy emblem in the stars and stripes of a waving American flag.

Knife blade is 3" long.

Includes a certificate of authenticity.

Washington Quarter:
The United States Treasury initially conceived of a limited issue commemorative coin to honor the bicentennial of George Washington's birth. However, after winning over the American public so convincingly upon its debut in 1932, the new coin was retained indefinitely. The obverse of the coin features the bust of George Washington, while the reverse shows an eagle with expanded wings clutching a bundle of arrows over an olive branch.

The design is the work of sculptor John Flanagan and came about as a result of an open competition held by the U.S. Treasury Department in 1931. A judging panel initially selected the submission of Laura Gardin Fraser (wife of Buffalo Nickel designer, James Earle Fraser) as the winner, but was overruled by Treasury Secretary Andrew W. Mellon, who declared Flanagan's design victorious. Though Mellon cited Flanagan's superior work as his reason for his decision, some believe the truth was that he simply could not bring himself to award first prize to a woman. In 1999, the United States Mint issued a five-dollar commemorative gold piece marking the 200th anniversary of Washington's death which featured Laura Gardin Fraser's design submission from the 1931 Washington Quarter contest.

For the Bicentennial of the United States in 1976, the U.S. Mint held another contest and requested design concepts for a reverse to be used on the Washington Quarter for the celebratory year. Similar competitions for the Bicentennial celebration were also held for the dollar and half-dollar coin designs. An image by Jack L. Ahr, featuring a regimental drummer in colonial army uniform adjacent to a torch surrounded by 13 stars, was chosen to appear on the quarter coin. The dual date of 1776-1976 was added to the obverse. John Flanagan's original design resumed production in 1977.

In 1999, the United States Mint celebrated the debut of the 50 State Quarters program. For every year in the subsequent decade, the Mint released five different reverse designs for the Washington quarter with each design honoring a different State in the Union. States were recognized by order of their entrance into the Union. The District of Columbia and United States Territories were honored in the same manner throughout the year in 2009. In 2010, the United States Mint began a 56-issue series for the Washington Quarter titled America the Beautiful Quarters program. Reverse designs in this series will feature national parks and sites in each of the 50 states, District of Columbia, and U.S. Territories.

Coin Glossary:

Die: An engraved piece of metal used to stamp a design on a coin.

Die crack: A small, raised imperfection on a coin resulting from a crack in the stamping die.

Early release: The Numismatic Guaranty Corporation (NGC) uses this designation for U.S. Bullion Coins during the first month of release from the U.S. Mint. To qualify for Early Release designation, NGC must receive the coins within 30 days of their release by the US Mint or properly documented as being received by an NGC approved entity within the same 30-day release period.

Encapsulated coin: A coin graded and authenticated by a professional coin service, then sealed in plastic.

Field: The typically flat area surrounding the relief and not used for legend or inscription.

Legal tender: Official money issued by the government.

Legend: The coin's primary lettering.

Lettered edge: An inscription added to the edge of a coin.

Luster: The quality of the surface brilliance on a Mint State or Uncirculated coin.

Mercury dime: Issued from 1916 to 1945, this U.S. dime featured a representation of Liberty in a winged hat that was commonly mistaken for the ancient god, Mercury.

Mint: A government controlled coin production facility.

Mint mark: A small letter stamped on a coin that indicates its mint origin, ex. "D" for Denver.

Mint Set: One coin from each of the available denominations in a particular year, produced by a single mint and made for circulation.

Mint State (Uncirculated): A regular production coin never used in trade and existing in its original condition.

Mintage: The number of coins produced.

NGC: Numismatic Guaranty Corporation.

Numismatics: The collection and study of monetary objects such as coins and paper bills.

Obverse: Heads, or a coin's front side.

Patina: Surface discoloration, typically green or brown, caused by oxidation over time.

PCGS: Professional Coin Grading Service.

Planchet: A blank metal piece used to produce a coin.

Proof: Expertly polished planchets and dies produce these coins which feature an extremely high quality strike, resulting in unmatched detail and brilliant surface finish.

Reeded edge: A coin edge finish featuring parallel vertical grooves all the way around.

Relief: The raised portion of a stamped design that sits above the coin's field.

Reverse: Tails, or coin's back side.

Rim: The raised ring around the perimeter of a coin designed to reduce wear on the relief.

Strike: The act of stamping a coin.

Truncation: The bottom edge of a portrait or bust.

Wheat penny: Lincoln cents issued from 1909 to 1958 bearing the wheat ear design on the reverse.