2013 Silver Eagle PF Reverse & SP Enhanced NGC West Point Mint Set

Heirloom Quality! This is the first time that we are offering a choice of PF Reverse (Proof) and SP (Specimen) with the limited edition set of two Silver Eagles from NGC! This is also the first time that any US Mint has ever minted an enhanced Silver Eagle and also the first time that West Point is minting a Reverse Proof! You will enjoy this Limited Edition Set for years to come!
This set celebrates the 75th anniversary of the edifice that houses the West Point Mint. Each set includes one Silver Eagle Reverse Proof PF69 or PF70 struck at the West Point Mint and bearing the "W" mint mark and one Silver Eagle Enhanced SP69 or SP70 struck at the West Point Mint and bearing the "W" mint mark. Your set comes in Original Government Packaging (OGP) which is encased in a highly polished, blue lacquered, hardwood presentation case and accompanied by a Certificate of Authenticity.

The design on the coin's obverse was taken from the "Walking Liberty" design by Adolph A. Weinman, which originally had been used on the Walking Liberty Half Dollar coin of the United States from 1916 to 1947. As this iconic design had been a public favorite, and one of the most beloved designs of any coinage of modern times, it was revived for the Silver Eagle decades later. The obverse is inscribed with the year of minting or issuance, the word Liberty, and the phrase 'In God We Trust'.

The reverse was designed by John Mercanti and portrays a Heraldic Eagle behind a shield; the eagle grasps an olive branch in its right talon and arrows in its left talon, echoing the Great Seal of the United States; above the eagle are 13 five-pointed stars representing the Thirteen Colonies. It is inscribed with the phrases United States of America, 1 oz. Fine Silver, One Dollar, and E Pluribus Unum.

Choices:
  • SP69 & PF69
  • SP70 & PF70

Specifications:
  • Certified: NGC
  • Grade: SP69
  • Coin Type: Silver American Eagle
  • Diameter: 40.6mm
  • Denomination: One Dollar
  • Mintage Year: 2013
  • Mint Mark: West Point, NY
  • Obverse: Walking Liberty
  • Reverse: Heraldic Eagle w/ Shield and 13 five-pointed stars.

Specifications:
  • Certified: NGC
  • Grade: PF69
  • Coin Type: Silver American Eagle
  • Diameter: 40.6mm
  • Denomination: One Dollar
  • Mintage Year: 2013
  • Mint Mark: West Point, NY
  • Obverse: Walking Liberty
  • Reverse: Heraldic Eagle w/ Shield and 13 five-pointed stars.

Specifications:
  • Certified: NGC
  • Grade: SP70
  • Coin Type: Silver American Eagle
  • Diameter: 40.6mm
  • Denomination: One Dollar
  • Mintage Year: 2013
  • Mint Mark: West Point, NY
  • Obverse: Walking Liberty
  • Reverse: Heraldic Eagle w/ Shield and 13 five-pointed stars.

Specifications:
  • Certified: NGC
  • Grade: PF70
  • Coin Type: Silver American Eagle
  • Diameter: 40.6mm
  • Denomination: One Dollar
  • Mintage Year: 2013
  • Mint Mark: West Point, NY
  • Obverse: Walking Liberty
  • Reverse: Heraldic Eagle w/ Shield and 13 five-pointed stars.

About the Designs:
The first coin features a reverse proof finish, with the raised design elements appearing mirrored and the background fields appearing frosted, or the reverse arrangement of the traditional proof finish. This coin was first offered in the 25th Anniversary set in 2006 and has since been offered in special sets in 2011 and 2012.

The second coin included in the set features an enhanced uncirculated finish, which was created by using a mixture of uncirculated, lightly frosted, and heavily frosted finishes. On the obverse, the mountains, red strikes and blue fields of the flag, Liberty’s sandals, and the date carry a heavily frosted finish. On the reverse, the ribbon held in the eagle’s beak, arrows, olive branch, and portions of the shield carry a heavily frosted finish. The remaining design elements or inscriptions carry an uncirculated finish. The background fields carry a lightly frosted finish. This contrast of three different finishes brings a fresh look to the classic design.

Display box measures: 5"L x 7"W x 2"H. Limited Edition of 281,310 minted in 2013.

Distributed by American Collectors Mint, LLC.
AmericanEagles    Dollars    

American Eagle:
The United States Mint began the American Eagle coin program in 1986. American Eagles are struck each year in silver, gold, and, since 1997, platinum bullion. The Silver Eagle is only available in a $1 denomination. As genuine legal tender, it is the only silver bullion coin whose weight and purity are guaranteed by the United States Government. Each silver coin contains a minimum of one troy ounce of 99.9% pure silver. The Gold Eagle comes in $5, $10, $25, and $50 denominations with the values representing 1/10, 1/4, 1/2, and 1 ounce of gold, respectively. The Platinum Eagle is struck in denominations of $10, $25, $50, and $100 with values representing 1/10, 1/4, 1/2, and 1 ounce of platinum, respectively. American Eagles are available in both Proof and Uncirculated strikes.

The Silver Eagle obverse features Adolph Weinman's classic "Liberty Walking" design which shows Lady Liberty mid-step, draped in the American flag with her right arm extended toward the sun and olive branches cradled in her left arm. The Gold Eagle obverse offers a design inspired by the 1907 $20 gold piece created by Augustus Saint-Gaudens with Lady Liberty standing at the center in front of the sun, holding a torch in her right hand and an olive branch in her left hand. The Platinum Eagle obverse shows the head and crown of the Statue of Liberty. The reverse design for regular strikes of the Platinum Eagle is a bald eagle flying in front of the sun. The reverse design for Proof strikes varies by year, but each includes a representation of an eagle somewhere in the image.

American Eagle:
The United States Mint began the American Eagle coin program in 1986. American Eagles are struck each year in silver, gold, and, since 1997, platinum bullion. The Silver Eagle is only available in a $1 denomination. As genuine legal tender, it is the only silver bullion coin whose weight and purity are guaranteed by the United States Government. Each silver coin contains a minimum of one troy ounce of 99.9% pure silver.

The Silver Eagle obverse features Adolph Weinman's classic "Liberty Walking" design which shows Lady Liberty mid-step, draped in the American flag with her right arm extended toward the sun and olive branches cradled in her left arm.

Eisenhower Dollar:
A provision in the Bank Holding Company Act of 1970 calling for the creation of a new dollar coin led to the design and production of the Eisenhower dollar, or "Ike" dollar. First struck in 1971, this coin featured on its obverse a superbly rendered profile of President Dwight D. Eisenhower by U.S. Mint Chief Engraver, Frank Gasparro. The reverse, also created by Gasparro, honored the first Moon Landing with a design inspired by the official Apollo 11 insignia. This dollar coin was the first to be minted and released since the end of the Peace Dollar production in 1935.

For the Bicentennial of the United States in 1976, the U.S. Mint held a contest and took submissions for reverse designs to be used on the Eisenhower Dollar for the celebratory year. An image by Dennis R. Williams featuring the Liberty Bell in front of the Moon was chosen to appear on the dollar coin. The dual date of 1776-1976 was added to the obverse.

Morgan Dollar:
An icon of the Old West and possibly the most popular coin in the history of the United States, the Morgan Silver Dollar continues to be a tremendous source of intrigue and inspiration for new and seasoned collectors alike. Designed by George T. Morgan, the coin debuted in 1878 and featured a depiction of Liberty on the obverse and an image of an eagle clutching arrows and an olive branch on the reverse.

Massive discoveries of precious metals in the American West during the mid to late 19th century, including the Comstock Lode, produced large amounts of silver bullion which began to drive down the Morgan Dollar's value. Those with vested interest in the price of silver appealed to the federal government for a solution to the falling market share of the coveted metal.

The result was the Bland-Allison Act of 1878 that sought to counteract the Coinage Act of 1873, also known as the Crime of '73, which demonetized silver and made gold the US currency standard. The US government approved the Bland-Allison Act to subsidize the silver industry through huge purchases of silver bullion to be minted into the Morgan Silver Dollar.

The Morgan Dollar was struck from 1878 until 1904. The design made a brief comeback in 1921 but was replaced by the Peace Dollar later that year.

Peace Dollar:
First issued in 1921, this United States one dollar silver coin succeeded the famous Morgan Dollar and featured a design by Anthony de Francisci. The armistice reached in the fall of 1918, putting an end to World War I, provided inspiration for the coin. The word "PEACE" found a home on the reverse of the design and bestowed upon the coin its name. The coin was minted from 1921-1928, then again in 1934 and 1935. The U.S. Mint brought the coin back briefly in the mid-1960s, but all Peace Dollars with the 1964 date were melted and never released into circulation.

The Peace Dollar was originally intended to be only a commemorative issue coin but fell into circulation in 1922. Its obverse features a profile of Liberty wearing a crown. The reverse shows an eagle perched on a rock near an olive branch while facing the rays of the sun.

Presidential Dollar:
The Presidential Dollar Program from the United States Mint ranged from 2007-2016. The Mint issues four coins per year with each coin honoring a different U.S. President. Presidents are featured in chronological order by term in office, beginning with George Washington. The obverse of the coin displays the image of a former U.S. President and changes with each release, while the reverse depicts the Statue of Liberty and remains constant for all strikes. The composition and dimensions of the Presidential Dollars mirror that of the Sacagawea Dollar in that they are golden in color, have a smooth edge, and feature a wide rim. The golden color is derived from layers of manganese brass covering a pure copper core.

Sacagawea Dollar:
When the Susan B. Anthony Dollar began circulation in 1979, it was often mistakenly identified as a quarter due to similar physical characteristics. As a result, it did not achieve widespread public acceptance. So to avoid the issues that prevented the success of the Susan B. Anthony Dollar, Congress passed the United States $1 Coin Act of 1997. This law stipulated that the next dollar coin should be golden in color, have a smooth edge, and feature a wider rim. These new attributes would allow the coin to be easily identified by sight or touch and distinguishable from other circulating coins.

Noted sculptor Glenna Goodacre's depiction of Sacagawea carrying her son, Jean Baptiste, won the favor of the DCDAC and became the obverse of the Golden Dollar. Sacagawea was the Native American Shoshone woman who acted as guide and interpreter for the Lewis and Clark Expedition. Because no known contemporary images of Sacagawea exist, artist Glenna Goodacre modeled the Sacagawea Dollar after a 22-year-old Shoshone woman.

The reverse of the coin was designed by U.S. Mint Engraver, Thomas D. Rogers, Sr., and shows an eagle in flight surrounded by 17 stars. Each star represents a state in the Union in 1804, the first year of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. The golden color of the Sacagawea Dollar derives from layers of manganese brass covering a pure copper core.

Susan B. Anthony Dollar:
The Susan B. Anthony dollar began circulation in 1979 amid much anticipation. Criticism quickly met the newly struck coin, though, as it was often mistakenly identified as a quarter due to similar physical attributes, such as the diameter and the reeded edge. As a result, the Sacagawea Dollar replaced the SBA Dollar.

Chief Engraver of the U.S. Mint, Frank Gasparro, sculpted the likeness of pioneer women's rights campaigner, Susan B. Anthony for the obverse of the coin. This marked the first occasion that a woman, other than a representation of Liberty, appeared on a United States coin. Gasparro also produced the modified Apollo 11 insignia motif for the reverse of the coin.


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