House of Waterford Blackwater Crystal Sherry Decanter w/ Four Glasses
The 2012 House of Waterford Crystal Designer Studio Collection is made in Ireland and gathers unique barware, entertaining pieces and home decor from brilliant Waterford designers. This Blackwater sherry decanter and four cordial glasses created by Waterford designer, Billy Briggs, showcases his individual skills and unique vision. Designer Billy Briggs is inspired by the majestic River Blackwater that rises in the Kerry Mountains and flows through counties Kerry, Cork, and Waterford. The famous Lismore Castle stands overlooking the river. The cut pattern captures the flow of the river and the sparkle of the sun's rays on the surface

Each year, the House of Waterford designers are given the opportunity to craft a signature piece, a creation that showcases their individual skills and unique vision. The six celebrated designers found inspiration for their works in a diverse spectrum of artisanal influences. Over the course of two centuries, Waterford has showcased the talents of some of the finest designers in the business.

Additional Information:
Measurements: Decanter: 13.75"H x 4.5"W (4.3lbs); Four Glasses: 5.25"H x 3"W (0.75lbs). Decanter Capacity: 24 oz (3 cups); Glasses Capacity: 7 oz. Made of crystal. For indoor display. Made in Ireland. Decanter has Numbered Limited Edition size of 150

Care Instructions:
Fine crystal should be hand washed separately in warm soapy water, rinsed thoroughly and dried with lint-free cloth. When washing and drying stemware, do not twist the bowl in the opposite direction to the stem as this can cause damage. We do not recommend using a dishwasher to clean your crystal as it can dull and damage the surface. Avoid pouring iced liquids or very hot water into crystal as extreme temperatures can crack or break your crystal. The finely made rims are the most fragile part of your crystal glass. Do not turn upside down while drying or storing.

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Wine Glass Types

Red Wine Glass: A red wine glass displays a fuller, rounder bowl than most glasses. This allows you to dip your nose into the glass to experience the wine's aroma. The bulbous setting of the glass allows the bouquet to aerate and develop while the longer stem provides the ability to swish the glass.

White Wine Glass: These glasses showcase more of a U-shape than red wine glasses. This allows a more concentrated aroma (whites are often not as pungent as reds) while also maintaining cool temperature.

Sparkling Wine Glass: The sparkling wine glass is most commonly known as a flute. This is because of its long, thin shape. This shaping helps the wine retain its carbonation and preserve flavoring.

Dessert Wine Glass: The dessert wine glass is the smallest type. Its short stem and glass are contrasted with a wide bouquet. Dessert wines have the highest concentration of alcohol, making their short stature a necessity. Finally, the wide bouquet allows the wine to aerate and develop properly overtime.

Proper Technique for Aerating & Decanting Your Wine
The purpose of letting wine breathe, or aerate, is maximizing your wine's exposure to the surrounding air. By allowing the wine to mix and mingle with air, it will typically warm up and the wine's aromas will open up, the flavor will soften a bit and the overall flavor characteristics should improve.

It is a common misconception that upon removing the cork, all bottles of wine need to be given time to breathe. This is not always the case. Not all wines require aeration. However, different wines require different amounts of time. Many wine sellers have experts that are educated on the wine they are selling so it's best to consult them regarding aeration time.

As soon as you open a bottle of wine, pour a small amount into your glass for a taste test. Wine is subjective in that there is no right or wrong flavor. If the wine is to your liking, then it's time to drink!

For wine that has aged for some time, a decanter is highly recommended. Many people simply open their bottle and let it sit. While adequate, it is not ideal. Decanting is a terrific technique for letting newer wines aerate and removing older wines' sediment. Sediment occurs in wine when pigments and tannins within the wine breakdown, leaving behind a harmless but bitter residue. Not only is sediment displeasing to the mouth, it's displeasing to the eye as well.

When decanting a wine with sediment, it's best to let the bottle stand upright, undisturbed for 24 hours. This allows the sediment to collect at the bottom of the bottle. After this allotted time, slowly pour your wine into a cleaned decanter. Observe the wine as it passes through the neck, stopping your pour upon the first sign of sediment.

The final result of this process leaves a decanter of pure wine and a bottle with some sediment-heavy wine left in it. While the remaining un-decanted wine may not taste the best, it makes a great addition to gravy or red sauces. Many wine enthusiasts pride themselves on their ability to find new and exciting uses for sediment-laden wine.

Proper decanting alters wine for the better, softening its bite and developing aromas and flavors more pleasing to the taste buds. Whether 100-years-old or one day, any bottle of wine will benefit from a decanter!