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Style at Home with Margie 52" Sophia's Hand-Carved Fainting Bench

This charming fainting bench features a beautiful brocade design on the fabric and richly detailed hand-carved designs on the legs and sides. Place in the foyer or at the foot of the bed. Add sophistication and style to any room of the house with this eye-catching piece.

Fainting couches, also called chaise lounges, were extremely popular with women in the 19th century. Rumor has it that the style got its name from women fainting on the lounge due to their tight corsets. Many gods and goddess from ancient Greece are depicted in this type of chair.

From the Style at Home with Margie Collection.

Frame made from MDF (medium density fiberboard) and wood; cover made from 60% cotton/40% polyester fabric with a 100% polyurethane fill. This bench measures 35-1/2"H x 52"L x 21-3/4"W and weighs 41.4 lbs. Clean with a damp, clean cloth; dry with soft, clean cloth. Low level of assembly is required (approximately 20 minutes). For indoor use only. Made in China.

Please Note: Assembly requires two people.

California residents only: “Proposition 65” WARNING

Furniture Styles

Queen Anne:
Made popular in the 19th century, the Queen Anne style of furniture is known to have a lighter and more feminine appearance. It is most commonly noted for its curving shapes, cabriole legs (a leg that has both an upper and lower curve) and cushioned seats. Padded feet (sometimes claw feet) are a signature feature on many Queen Anne pieces. Another feature to look for is carved scroll and shell motifs typically found on the crest and knees of chairs. Queen Anne furniture is crafted from a variety of woods with brass or wooden hardware.

Baroque:
Originating in Rome at the beginning of the 17th century, this style of furniture is characterized by dramatic effects, grand design and details to impress. Some pieces are similar to the Queen Anne style, with curvy lines and cabriole legs. However, the majority of pieces are over-the-top with features such as gold, marble, cherubs, angels and mirrors. Intricate design details also tend to cover the arms, legs and any other open spaces along the furniture.

Mission:
Mission style furniture is plain and simple in design. A strong emphasis is placed on vertical and horizontal lines. The pieces have no extra detail work and are known for their basic straight line construction. Most pieces are created in wood with a dark or medium stain. If the piece is for sitting, it is typically covered in leather material. Very basic iron, steel or copper is used as the hardware.

Chippendale:
Very similar to the Queen Anne style, these pieces are slightly more elaborate and are intricately carved with natural motifs like shells or acanthus leaves. Originally introduced in the 1700s, the Chippendale style can be classified into three types: French influence, Chinese influence and Gothic influence. Many Chippendale pieces have cabriole legs with padded claws, but with much more scroll work and fancy ornamentation. High quality mahogany wood and fine upholstered fabric are two key characteristics. Pieces for sitting are usually in horseshoe, square or trapezoid shapes and are upholstered in leather, silk, tapestry, velvet, needlepoint, hair cloth or brocade.

Sheraton:
Sheraton is a neoclassical style characterized by delicate straight lines, light construction, contrasting veneers and ornamentation. At one time it was the most reproduced style in the United States. In contrast to Chippendale or Queen Anne styles, Sheraton pieces usually have straight or tapered legs, sometimes joined with stretchers. Many pieces often have more than one type of wood (satin, beech and mahogany being the most popular). Common details on these pieces include drapery swags, lyres, ribbons, fans, feathers, urns and flowers. Lion heads, stamped plates, rosettes and urns are typically found on the hardware. The majority of Sheraton pieces are square or rectangular. Sofas are noted for a clean flow without a noticeable break and exposed arms.

Modern:
The elements of modern design include both curved and horizontal lines. Pieces such as shelves, tables and cases often have an appearance of "floating" with hidden support. Modern pieces are often asymmetrical, unembellished and are known to be longer and lower to the ground. Materials like molded plywood, plastic and metal are very common in modern furniture. The majority of modern pieces have slender legs that contribute to an open and airy atmosphere. You'll also find the furniture often has a bright pop of color to offset a bland room.

Contemporary:
Contemporary style pieces stick with the theme that less is more. You'll find asymmetrical shapes with straight and simple lines and no decoration or ornament detail. Sofas, chairs and ottomans have exposed legs. Beds and chairs usually have no skirt, trim, fringe or other enhancements. The furniture is typically designed in neutral colors. What is considered to be contemporary furniture is always changing and is truly of the moment.

Victorian:
Victorian style furniture draws its influence from Queen Victoria and generally contains elaborate detailing like carvings and applied ornaments. Constructed to be long lasting, the wood used is very heavy in nature (such as mahogany, burr walnut, rosewood or ebony). Buttoned upholstery is a key standard in armchairs and sofas. Cabriole legs are found on tables, beds, chairs, desks and cabinets. Dark finishes on all pieces help to create a formal appearance.

Rustic:
Rustic furniture pieces appear to have a "worn in" look. They don't have a lacquered shine or contain any plastic. Many of the pieces are scratched and nicked to enhance their appearance. Often times real parts of tree branches and trunks are used to create a functional piece of furniture. For example, bed posts, chair legs, tabletops and lamp legs can be created from thick branches or tree trunks. Elements of wood and nature are present throughout rustic pieces.

Scandinavian Contemporary:
Scandinavian contemporary pieces can be described as furniture that adds function. Concealed storage compartments, slide out tables and trundle beds are unique characteristics that set this style apart from others. You'll find that these pieces are made out of a variety of sturdy wood including ash, birch, black walnut, elm, hickory, mahogany, maple, oak and teak. They feature straight lines with a simple design and have very little ornamentation. The idea is function versus appearance. Hardware is typically made of wood and upholstery covers most seating pieces, chair arms and backs.

Hepplewhite:
Hepplewhite is a neoclassic style characterized by a delicate appearance, tapered legs, and the use of contrasting veneers and inlay. It is named after British designer and cabinetmaker George Hepplewhite whose designs in "The Cabinet Maker and Upholsterers Guide" were published posthumously in 1788. This style was reproduced in the United States particularly in the Carolinas, Maryland, New England, New York and Virginia.

Margie Commerford Style at Home with Margie
The Style at Home Collection by Margie Commerford features distinctive global decor and home accents. The collection includes items such as rugs, furniture, floor screens and stained glass panels and lighting. Each item is carefully chosen to ensure high quality and exceptional style.

The lighting pieces offered by Margie are designed by some of the most innovative artists in the world of stained glass. Each is made using the highest quality materials and utilizing the copper foil technique, which is an authentic glass assembly method developed more than 100 years ago.

Many of the home decor items are made by traditional methods that have been passed down for generations in parts of the world such as India and Asia. Villages are often dependent upon these crafts for work, and it helps promote the continuation of beautiful goods.

The Style at Home Collection was developed to provide exotic, high quality pieces at affordable prices.  Each item offers a timeless beauty that is meant to be shared for years to come.

 

About Margie Commerford
Margie Commerford, the renowned “lamp lady” from Style at Home has been in the retail business with her husband for several decades. Margie explains, “We started our business from simple beginnings, selling stuffed animals from the back of our van in Miami. What a journey it has been!”

Eventually their business grew into one of the leading importers of stained glass lighting in the country. For years, she has been on EVINE Live offering magnificent stained glass lighting, exotic hand-carved furniture and home accents.

Margie works closely with her husband, Terry, who travels extensively to India, China, Indonesia, Malaysia and Thailand. Together they hand-pick every item to ensure the quality and style is something to be cherished. Margie enjoys finding “treasures” from their travels to present on-air. She says, “Each piece I offer has a story to tell. I love to provide customers with these stories so they too can understand how special each item is.”

When Margie isn’t working, she enjoys biking and spending time with her family and friends. She has two children, Rachel and Darrin, who she absolutely adores, so her schedule is always jam-packed. “I like to make sure that whatever I’m doing, work or play, I’m purely enjoying myself. That’s what life is about.”
Tuesday, August 23
  • 4AM ET with Host
  • 5AM ET with Host