Roma Jewelry Armoire Wall Mount

Stop digging through a cluttered jewelry box and get organized with this lovely wall mount jewelry armoire. A rich espresso finish accentuates the character of the traditional styling. Decorative square floral applique on each corner are mirrored with another carved applique that stretches across the top. Black felt and an assortment of jewelry storage options line the inside. The door has a keyed lock on the right side to secure your valuables.

  • Armoire: 17" x 5" x 32"

    No assembly required. Made of mirror, MDF w/ veneer and black felt lining.

    Warranty: 1 year limited warranty

  • Jewelry Care:

    Maximize the life and brilliance of your jewelry with proper care and storage techniques to combat exposure to everyday elements. A little TLC will keep your jewelry beautiful for many years.

    Everyday Care:

  • Remove your jewelry at night and put it in a jewelry box with fabric-lined compartments or dividers that keep pieces from rubbing against one another. If you don’t have a jewelry box as such, wrap each piece carefully in tissue paper so that pieces don’t scratch one another or get tangled.
  • Also remove your jewelry before bathing and grooming. Put your jewelry on as a final touch after using cosmetics, hair products and lotions so that it doesn’t accumulate residue or film that is difficult to remove.
  • Remove rings when washing your hands to keep them dry. Moisture weakens springs and clasps and may loosen stones that are secured by glue, such as pearls and gemstones. Water can also cause spots on jewelry left to air dry.
  • Although most jewelry is quite durable, don’t wear your jewelry while doing heavy physical work around the house or in the garden. Stones may be chipped when knocked against other objects or each other.
  • Don’t expose your jewelry to chemicals, including bleach, perfumes, soaps, cosmetics, hairsprays, etc.
  • Don’t expose your precious pieces to extremes in temperature and humidity.

    Maintenance Care:

  • Bring items to a qualified jeweler if you have a loose stone setting, stones moving or any other damage present. Also, have your jeweler check your items, especially rings, once a year in order to ensure prongs and mountings are secure.
  • Have your jewelry professionally cleaned every six months to one year.
  • You can check for loose stones between visits to your jeweler by tapping on the setting with your finger, near your ear.

    Storage Guidelines:

  • Keep gemstone jewelry, pearls, gold and silver pieces all separated to prevent damage.
  • A diamond—the hardest gem known to humans—can scratch a pearl, so be careful to store your hard gems separately from your softer jewels. Keep them wrapped in velvet, tissue paper, silk or soft pouches. Additionally, be aware that one diamond can scratch another when thrown together in a jewelry box.
  • Water can be used to clean and rinse some jewelry, but is should be dried thoroughly afterward, especially before storing. Usually, though, a good rule of thumb is to keep your jewelry dry.

    Cleaning Your Jewelry:
    Jewelry is prone to getting dirty, dusty, smudged, dull, dingy and grimy from everyday wear. Lotions, soaps, cosmetics and even your natural skin oils and the air can oxidize or discolor mountings and create a film on gemstones or behind ring settings, thereby masking their brilliance. Simply clean your jewelry regularly and it will look as good as new. The frequency and method of cleaning you use depends on the jewelry piece and how often you wear it. Periodic professional cleaning is a good idea. In the interim, however, you can clean many of your jewelry pieces at home with a few simple, inexpensive methods.

    Bath Method: Fill a small bowl with warm water and mild household liquid detergent, creating suds. Brush the jewelry with a soft brush, such as an old toothbrush or an eyebrow brush, creating a lather. Try to brush under the stones and in between prongs. Using a metal or plastic strainer, rinse off the pieces with warm water. Make sure the sink has a stopper in place. Pat the items dry with a soft, lint-free cloth.

    Cold Soak Methods:

  • Method 1: Prepare a solution of four parts cold water and one part mild dishwashing detergent. Soak the jewelry for a few minutes, then lift it out and tap gently on all sides of the mounting with a soft brush. Rinse the items in the solution once more and then drain on tissue paper.
  • Method 2: Make a solution of equal parts cold water and household ammonia. Soak the pieces half an hour. Remove them from the solution and tap gently around the mounting with an old soft toothbrush. Then, rinse the pieces in the solution once more and drain them on tissue paper.

    Quick Dip Method: Use a brand-name jewelry cleaner made for the kinds of stones and metals in your jewelry. Carefully follow the manufacturer’s instructions. Do not touch clean stones with your fingers. Please use commercial cleaners with caution; they may be no more effective than household cleaners, but may be more convenient for you. They are generally safe for diamonds, rubies and sapphires, but be sure not to soak these items for more than a few minutes. Commercial cleaners may be harmful to some gemstones; they are not recommended for opals, pearls, corals, lapis lazulis, turquoise and emeralds, as they may damage or reduce these stones’ luster.

    Ultrasonic Method: Ultrasonic jewelry cleaners are small, modern machines that quickly clean any piece of jewelry that can be soaked in a liquid. They usually have a metal cup filled with water and a cleaning agent. When the machine is on, high-frequency turbulence cleans the jewelry. Be sure to follow manufacturer’s instructions and warnings for using the machine. Also, consult a trusted professional jeweler to ensure an ultrasonic cleaner is appropriate for your pieces and to determine which one to use, as there are many different models available. Ultrasonic cleaners are typically only safe for diamonds, rubies and sapphires. They may cause damage to emeralds, opals, pearls and other colored gemstones.

    Furniture Styles

    Queen Anne:
    Made popular in the 19th century, the Queen Anne style of furniture is known to have a lighter and more feminine appearance. It is most commonly noted for its curving shapes, cabriole legs (a leg that has both an upper and lower curve) and cushioned seats. Padded feet (sometimes claw feet) are a signature feature on many Queen Anne pieces. Another feature to look for is carved scroll and shell motifs typically found on the crest and knees of chairs. Queen Anne furniture is crafted from a variety of woods with brass or wooden hardware.

    Originating in Rome at the beginning of the 17th century, this style of furniture is characterized by dramatic effects, grand design and details to impress. Some pieces are similar to the Queen Anne style, with curvy lines and cabriole legs. However, the majority of pieces are over-the-top with features such as gold, marble, cherubs, angels and mirrors. Intricate design details also tend to cover the arms, legs and any other open spaces along the furniture.

    Mission style furniture is plain and simple in design. A strong emphasis is placed on vertical and horizontal lines. The pieces have no extra detail work and are known for their basic straight line construction. Most pieces are created in wood with a dark or medium stain. If the piece is for sitting, it is typically covered in leather material. Very basic iron, steel or copper is used as the hardware.

    Very similar to the Queen Anne style, these pieces are slightly more elaborate and are intricately carved with natural motifs like shells or acanthus leaves. Originally introduced in the 1700s, the Chippendale style can be classified into three types: French influence, Chinese influence and Gothic influence. Many Chippendale pieces have cabriole legs with padded claws, but with much more scroll work and fancy ornamentation. High quality mahogany wood and fine upholstered fabric are two key characteristics. Pieces for sitting are usually in horseshoe, square or trapezoid shapes and are upholstered in leather, silk, tapestry, velvet, needlepoint, hair cloth or brocade.

    Sheraton is a neoclassical style characterized by delicate straight lines, light construction, contrasting veneers and ornamentation. At one time it was the most reproduced style in the United States. In contrast to Chippendale or Queen Anne styles, Sheraton pieces usually have straight or tapered legs, sometimes joined with stretchers. Many pieces often have more than one type of wood (satin, beech and mahogany being the most popular). Common details on these pieces include drapery swags, lyres, ribbons, fans, feathers, urns and flowers. Lion heads, stamped plates, rosettes and urns are typically found on the hardware. The majority of Sheraton pieces are square or rectangular. Sofas are noted for a clean flow without a noticeable break and exposed arms.

    The elements of modern design include both curved and horizontal lines. Pieces such as shelves, tables and cases often have an appearance of "floating" with hidden support. Modern pieces are often asymmetrical, unembellished and are known to be longer and lower to the ground. Materials like molded plywood, plastic and metal are very common in modern furniture. The majority of modern pieces have slender legs that contribute to an open and airy atmosphere. You'll also find the furniture often has a bright pop of color to offset a bland room.

    Contemporary style pieces stick with the theme that less is more. You'll find asymmetrical shapes with straight and simple lines and no decoration or ornament detail. Sofas, chairs and ottomans have exposed legs. Beds and chairs usually have no skirt, trim, fringe or other enhancements. The furniture is typically designed in neutral colors. What is considered to be contemporary furniture is always changing and is truly of the moment.

    Victorian style furniture draws its influence from Queen Victoria and generally contains elaborate detailing like carvings and applied ornaments. Constructed to be long lasting, the wood used is very heavy in nature (such as mahogany, burr walnut, rosewood or ebony). Buttoned upholstery is a key standard in armchairs and sofas. Cabriole legs are found on tables, beds, chairs, desks and cabinets. Dark finishes on all pieces help to create a formal appearance.

    Rustic furniture pieces appear to have a "worn in" look. They don't have a lacquered shine or contain any plastic. Many of the pieces are scratched and nicked to enhance their appearance. Often times real parts of tree branches and trunks are used to create a functional piece of furniture. For example, bed posts, chair legs, tabletops and lamp legs can be created from thick branches or tree trunks. Elements of wood and nature are present throughout rustic pieces.

    Scandinavian Contemporary:
    Scandinavian contemporary pieces can be described as furniture that adds function. Concealed storage compartments, slide out tables and trundle beds are unique characteristics that set this style apart from others. You'll find that these pieces are made out of a variety of sturdy wood including ash, birch, black walnut, elm, hickory, mahogany, maple, oak and teak. They feature straight lines with a simple design and have very little ornamentation. The idea is function versus appearance. Hardware is typically made of wood and upholstery covers most seating pieces, chair arms and backs.

    Hepplewhite is a neoclassic style characterized by a delicate appearance, tapered legs, and the use of contrasting veneers and inlay. It is named after British designer and cabinetmaker George Hepplewhite whose designs in "The Cabinet Maker and Upholsterers Guide" were published posthumously in 1788. This style was reproduced in the United States particularly in the Carolinas, Maryland, New England, New York and Virginia.