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Gemporia 14K Gold 5.83ctw Princess Cut Anahi Ametrine & Diamond Ring

Perfectly pretty design splashed in radiant color and shimmer! Crafted in 14K yellow gold, this ravishing ring shimmers with one princess cut Anahi ametrine in a diamond-style orientation at the center. Floral-inspired chevron shapes filled with glistening diamonds decorate the upper sides of the shank. Cage-like side galleries wrap around the stones as an undergallery fills in the back for a comfortable fit.

Ring Details

  • Metal: 14K yellow gold with rhodium plated accents
  • Stone Information: 
  • Anahi Ametrine: One square princess cut 11mm
  • Diamond: 20 round full cut 1.0-1.5mm
  • Setting Type: Prong
  • Diamond Color Grade: G-H
  • Diamond Clarity Grade: SI1-SI2
  • Approximate Total Weight:
  • Anahi Ametrine: 5.70ct
  • Diamond: 0.13ct
  • Measurements: 5/8"L x 13/16"W x 5/16"H
  • Collection: Gemporia
  • Country of Origin: India

All weights pertaining to gemstones, including diamonds, are minimum weights. Additionally, please note that many gemstones are treated to enhance their beauty. View Gemstone Enhancements and Special Care Requirements for important information.

YellowGold    14KGold    Ametrine    

Yellow Gold
By far the most common color of gold used in jewelry, yellow gold is gold in its natural shade. Yellow gold is usually alloyed with copper and silver to increase the strength of the metal. How yellow the metal is depends upon the content of gold. A 14-karat piece of jewelry will have a brighter yellow hue than a 10-karat piece. Likewise, an 18-karat piece of jewelry will have a deeper yellow than 14-karat gold, and so on.

Gold Karat
Gold's softness and malleability make it a wonderful metal to work with when creating virtually any design in jewelry. But this softness can be a drawback as well. To make it stronger and more durable, gold is usually alloyed, or mixed, with other metals such as copper or silver. The higher a metal's percentage of gold content, the softer and more yellow the jewelry piece. The karat weight system used to measure gold in a piece is the same for all hues, including white and yellow gold.

The word “carat” is Arabic, meaning “bean seed.” This is because historically seeds were used to measure weights of gold and precious stones. In the United States, “karat” with a “k” is used to measure gold's purity, while “carat” with a “c” is used in measuring a gemstone's size. The karat mark of gold represents the percentage of pure gold to alloy.

  • 24K is pure gold or 100% gold
  • 21K is 21/24ths gold content or 87.5% gold: In the United States, jewelry with this karatage or higher is rare. It is far more common in Europe, the Middle East and Southeast Asia.
  • 18K is 18/24ths gold content or 75% gold: This karatage is a popular high-end choice in the United States, Europe and other regions. Its popularity is spreading throughout North America.
  • 14K is 14/24ths gold content or 58.5% gold: This is the most common gold karatage in the United States because of its fine balance between gold content, durability and affordability.
  • 10K is 10/24ths gold content or 41.7% gold: This karatage is gaining popularity for its affordability and durability. Commonly used in everyday-wear jewelry such as rings, 10K gold beautifully withstands wear and tear. It is the lowest gold content that can be legally marked or sold as gold jewelry in the United States.

    In order to determine the karat weight of a specific item, simply look for the quality mark. Jewelry items will bear the stamp of their karatage based upon the United States or European system of marking. The United States system designates pieces by their karats—24K, 18K, 14K, 10K, etc. The European system designates pieces by their percentage of gold content. For instance, 10K gold is marked “417,” denoting 41.7% gold; 14K is marked “585,” denoting 58.5% gold; and 18K is marked “750,” denoting 75% gold; etc.

    Ametrine
    Ametrine is a variety of quartz that exhibits the best aspects of both purple amethyst and yellow citrine within the same crystal. These bicolor yellow and purple quartz gemstones have a hardness of 7.0 on the Mohs Scale and are ideally suited for a variety of jewelry uses.

    Ametrine is most typically faceted in a rectangular shape with a 50/50 pairing of amethyst and citrine. When cut into emerald and pear shapes, the color distinction is most notable. Sometimes a checkerboard pattern of facets is added to the top to increase light reflection. Ametrine can also be cut to blend the two colors so that the resulting stone is a mix of yellow, purple and peach tones throughout the stone. When ametrine is fashioned as the less-common brilliant round shape, its colors reflect and blend together to create the peach-like color.

    Ametrine is especially popular among artistic cutters and carvers who can play with the colors, creating landscapes in the stone. Amethyst's purple and citrine's yellow are opposite each other on the color wheel. They are called complementary colors, meaning that they enhance each other, and are considered by artists to be excellent colors to use together. Because its beauty lies in the coexistence of the two colors, ametrine is usually recovered in larger sizes; over five carats is most popular, which allows for the appreciation of the pronounced color contrast.

    The Anahi Mine in Bolivia is the major world producer of ametrine. The mine first became famous in the seventeenth century when a Spanish conquistador received it as a dowry upon marrying a princess from the Ayoreos tribe, named Anahi. Ametrine was introduced to Europe through the conquistador's gifts to the Spanish queen. The stone is relatively inexpensive, considering that it comes from only a few mines in the world, including Bolivia and Brazil. Several suppliers have indicated that the ametrine mines have run out, and therefore quality material is now very difficult to obtain.

    As a newcomer, ametrine does not yet have folklore or historical significance attached to it, as do amethyst and citrine. Some sources believe, however, that the best aspects of amethyst and citrine lore should be attributed to ametrine since it is a combination of both gems.

  • About the Collection
    Feel great about amazing style with jewelry from Gemporia. Founder Steve Bennett created Gemporia as a way to bring beautiful, high-quality gemstone jewelry to digital customers while lifting the veil on the entire gemstone industry. By forging strong relationships with mines and jewelers around the world, Gemporia is able to be first to market with new gemstones at an incredible value to their customers. This groundbreaking approach has solidified them as a true leader in the gemstone industry while also allowing them to educate shoppers. Each brilliantly cut Gemporia stone is meticulously set in either sterling silver or 14 karat gold and showcased in one of their clean, modern designs. Beyond providing customers with great value, their unique business model helps improve the lives of mine workers and their communities so you can feel great about looking amazing.

    Gemporia
    Pretty. Amazing.

    Jake ThompsonAbout the Guest
    Gemstone investor Jake Thompson travels the globe sourcing quality gemstones and forging relationships with mining and cutting communities all over the world. By utilizing this unique network, Jake is able to acquire parcels of rare gemstones and the latest discoveries before most are even aware they exist at a fraction of the price. Focusing on this direct mine to market approach, the value offered to collectors from these parcels is revolutionizing the gemstone jewelry landscape.