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Gem Adventurer 1.40ctw Oval Cut 8 x 6mm Brazilian Pink Tourmaline Loose Gemstone

Positively pink! Pretty and pastel this Brazilian pink tourmaline is meant for you. Wear it as a statement piece and command attention everywhere you go. Easily wear it with your other favorite gems and jewels for a look that's just as fashionable, feminine and fab!

Stone Details

  • Gemstone: Brazilian Pink Tourmaline
  • Shape/Cut: Approximate Total Weight: 1.40ct
  • Measurements: 8 x 6mm
  • Collection: Gem Adventurer
  • Country of Origin: Brazil

About Brazilian Pink Tourmaline

One of the world's most colorful gem varieties, tourmaline comes in beautiful pinks with desirable medium tones that are not too dark or too light. Dependent on expert cutting and an eye-clean clarity, the highest quality clarity grade for colored gemstones, tourmaline is always challenging for the lapidary due to areas of internal tension inside tourmaline crystals and its inherent pleochroism (colors and their intensity change when viewed from different angles). Every tourmaline in this Gem Adventurer collection has been faceted by experienced lapidaries who carefully orientate each crystal to maximize the gem's colorful brilliance. Tourmalines are 'day gems' typically looking their very best in natural light.

Tourmaline frequently garners the nickname, 'the chameleon gem', not only because of its multitude of colors, but also because of its historic propensity to be confused with other gemstones. Tourmaline is derived from the Sinhalese 'turmali', which means 'mixed parcel' or 'stone with mixed colors' and are a group of related minerals whose differences in composition result in a huge variety of colors.

Coming from Afghanistan, Africa and Brazil, tourmaline is a group of related minerals whose differences in composition result in a plethora of colors. In the summer of 1998, one of the world's major deposits was unearthed near the city of Ibadan in Nigeria's Oyo state. In less than two years it was virtually mined out and despite subsequent discoveries, remains very difficult to source. Tourmaline has significantly increased in price and decreased in availability.

Tourmaline has a Mohs' Hardness rating of 7.0 - 7.5. Always store tourmaline carefully to avoid scuffs and scratches. Clean with gentle soap and lukewarm water, scrubbing behind the gem with a very soft toothbrush as necessary. After cleaning, pat dry with a soft towel or chamois cloth.

Why Buy Loose Gemstones?

As gem mines are becoming more and more depleted, gemstones of all types are becoming increasingly sought-after. Whether you are a collector or a first-time buyer, you will be amazed by the timeless glamor loose gems have to offer! They are fun to collect and look spectacular no matter how you display them. You can make an appointment with your jeweler to experience the joy of creating your very own, one-of-a-kind design. Choose from a variety of settings and styles to create a completely unique presentation that's sprung from your own imagination. Or display your loose gems under glass, showcasing rare and vibrant stones in an artistic and sophisticated manner. No matter how they're displayed, loose gemstones are brilliant collectibles for gem lovers and avid collectors alike!

All weights pertaining to gemstones, including diamonds, are minimum weights. Additionally, please note that many gemstones are treated to enhance their beauty. View Gemstone Enhancements and Special Care Requirements for important information.

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Gemstone Glossary

Cut: Refers to the geometric shape and proportions of a gemstone. A gemstone’s cut is what most directly affects its sparkle or brilliance.

Facet: A flat cut on the surface of a gemstone.

Fire: Flashes of rainbow colors. Also called “dispersion.”

Hardness: Resistance to scratching. The higher the number, the more resistant.

Hue: Another word for color.

Luster: The shininess of a jewel.

Opaque: The opposite of transparent. Light cannot pass through an opaque gemstone, therefore they do not have any sparkle or fire.

Saturation: This term refers to how pure or deep a gemstone’s color is. Some gemstones, like aquamarine, have a naturally low saturation (very light blue) while other gemstones, like amethysts, can have very high saturation (rich, dark purple).

Sparkle: The white light leaving a jewel, traveling upward, which is visible to the eye. Sparkle is often referred to as “brilliance.”

Toughness: Resistance to breakage.

Gemstone Shapes & Cuts
These are the common shapes or cuts for gemstones, each lending a different look and allure.

Baguette: Baguette means “stick” or “rod” in French, which makes it a very appropriate name for this gemstone shape. Diamond baguettes are often used as accent stones to flank a primary stone.

Brilliant: Any gemstone cut with 58 facets, which produces the maximum possible sparkle. A brilliant cut can have several shapes, including round, oval, pear, radiant and heart.

Cabochon: This shape features a rounded, perfectly smooth surface instead of facets. It is the oldest gemstone shape and is commonly used with opaque stones such as opal, jade and turquoise.

Cushion: A very popular style for most of the 19th century, cushion shapes are slightly domed with rounded corners that make the stone look like a pillow. In fact, this shape is often referred to as a “pillow cut.” It looks particularly beautiful in candlelight.

Emerald: With its long, steep facets, emerald cuts tend to flash rather than sparkle.

Fancy: Technically, this term refers to any type of gemstone that isn’t round, but many jewelers reserve it to describe the more exotic gemstone shapes such as marquise, heart, pear and trillion.

Heart: Often described as a custom cut, heart-shaped gemstones are very popular for pendants.

Marquise: According to legend, this shape was commissioned by King Louis XV to resemble the smile of his mistress, Marquise de Pompadour. Ideal marquise cuts have a length to width ratio of 2:1.

Oval: Similar to the round shape, oval gemstones produce a high amount of sparkle and fire.

Pear: This is a classic teardrop shape that is ideal for earrings and pendants.

Princess: This a relatively new shape that combines the sharp, flat edges of an emerald shape with numerous small facets, which produce both sparkle and fire.

Radiant: This shape is similar to emerald, but it adds extra facets on the edges and corners to increase the gemstone’s sparkle.

Round: This classic shape produces maximum sparkle and fire, making it an ideal shape for diamonds.

Tapered Baguette: A tapered baguette is a baguette shape with one end that is narrower than the other.

Trillion: A very striking, usually three-sided shape, trillion gemstones (especially diamonds) are celebrated for the intense fire they produce.

The Mohs Scale
The most common measure of a gemstone's degree of hardness is based on the Mohs Scale. Devised by German geologist Friedrich Mohs in 1812, the Mohs Scale grades minerals on a comparative scale from 1 (very soft) to 10 (very hard).

Hardness is generally associated with durability and the ability to resist breakage. When referring to gemstones, however, hardness more accurately means the stone's ability to resist abrasion. What the scale means is that a mineral of a given hardness rating will scratch other minerals of the same rating, as well as any minerals of a lower hardness rating. For example, rubies and sapphires, which are composed of the mineral corundum and have a Mohs rating of 9, will scratch each other, as well as topaz (rating 8) and quartz (rating 7). But they will not scratch diamonds, which are rated 10 and considered the hardest substance.

The numeric values assigned to each interval of hardness are not equal. Some stones are disproportionately harder than others. Because Mohs Scale wasn't made for exact precision, it uses half numbers for in-between hardness ratings.

Topaz:
A symbol of strength and intelligence, topaz derives its name from Topazios, an island in the Red Sea that is known today as Zabargad. The Greek word “topazios” means “to seek,” since the island was covered with a thick fog and difficult to find. Gemstones found on the island were called topaz, although the stones were eventually found to actually be peridot. The real gem of topaz is found throughout the world, with different occurrences producing specific colors.

Brown, yellow, orange and red topaz are found in Brazil, Sri Lanka and Siberia. Most brownish topaz is heated to produce a permanent and glamorous pink color. Following the discovery of pink topaz in Russia during the 19th century, Imperial topaz was found. Featuring a sherry red, deep pink or reddish-orange color, the gem was so coveted that its ownership was restricted to the Czar, his family and those who received it as a royal gift. Today, Imperial shades are the most rare and, therefore, the most valuable.

Blue topaz is rarely found in nature and is most often created through a combination of heat treatment and irradiation. It is found in Brazil, Sri Lanka, Nigeria and China. Topaz is often colorless, too, and can be found in the United States, Mexico, Russia and Pakistan. In 1998, a new type of enhanced topaz made its appearance with a greenish-blue or emerald green color. All colors of topaz rank an 8.0 on the Mohs Scale of hardness.

Yellow topaz is November’s birthstone and blue topaz is December’s birthstone. Blue topaz is also the traditional gift for 4th and 19th wedding anniversaries, while Imperial topaz is celebrated as a 23rd anniversary gift. Perhaps the most famous topaz is a large, colorless stone known as the Braganza. It was discovered in Brazil in 1740 and was originally thought to be a priceless diamond. Today, the giant 1,680.00ct stone is set in the Portuguese Crown.

The mystery and allure of topaz goes back thousands of years. To the ancients, it was a symbol of love and affection and was thought to ward off sudden death. The Romans associated topaz with Jupiter, the god of the sun. The Greeks called it the Stone of Strength, believing it had the power to increase strength and make its wearer invisible in times of emergency. The Egyptians said the gem was colored with the golden glow of the sun god, Ra, making topaz a powerful amulet that protected its wearer against harm.

Topaz' mystical curative powers were believed to wax and wane with the phases of the moon. The gem was said to change color in the presence of poisoned food or drink and falcons were carved on the stones to help earn the goodwill of kings and magnates.

Today, topaz is said to be the gem that has the widest range of curative powers. It is believed to dispel enchantment and protect against negative emotions such as anger, fear, greed and envy. Its properties are supposedly enhanced when the gem is mounted in gold. Because of this association with gold, topaz is used to bring or enhance the wearer's money-gathering abilities and has long been used in money and wealth rituals.

Wearing topaz is said to improve and deepen relationships, promote patience, ensure fidelity and enhance the ability to love. The gem is also believed to bring friendship, intelligence, long life, beauty and a pleasant disposition.