Jewelry Sale & Clearance | Splurge with 6 ValuePay®P on virtually all jewelry

NYC II® 11.70ctw Prasiolite & White Topaz Drop Earrings

Imagine it's the early 20th century. You're invited to a massive party at a sprawling estate just south of New York City. It's just after dusk and the car pulls around and stops at the foot of the stone steps that lead to the towering front doors of the main house. You can hear the band playing inside and din of festive voices as you step out. Catch that vibe? It's the same one rippling through these gorgeous earrings.

Each earring in the pair showcases one sparkling oval cut prasiolite surrounded by white topaz on the dangling drop. Additional white topaz gemstones converge on the post to create a shimmering floral shape. Black rhodium provides that extra touch of allure.

Details
  • Metal: Black rhodium over sterling silver
  • Stone Information:
    Prasiolite: Two oval cut 11 x 9mm
    White Topaz: 24 marquise cut 4 x 2mm and 26 round modified-brilliant cut 3mm
  • Setting Type: Prong
  • Approximate Total Weight:
    Prasiolite: 6.09ct
    White Topaz: 5.60ct
  • Measurements: 1-1/4"L x 11/16"W x 1/4"H
  • Backing: Butterfly
  • Collection: NYC II
  • Country of Origin: China

Warranty: Items will be covered for a period of one year from the invoice date. Please call 1-844-752-4825.

All weights pertaining to gemstones, including diamonds, are minimum weights. Additionally, please note that many gemstones are treated to enhance their beauty. View Gemstone Enhancements and Special Care Requirements for important information.

SterlingSilver    Prasiolite    Drops    

Sterling Silver

Sterling silver, also called fine silver, is a beautifully lustrous cool-toned precious metal favored in fine jewelry among other products. The most reflective of all metals (excluding mercury), sterling silver looks stunning by itself and brings out the best hues in an array of colorful gemstones.

Sterling silver can be polished to a higher sheen than platinum. In fact, Ag, the chemical symbol for silver, comes from a word that means “white and shining.” The surface of silver can boast that shiny, polished appearance, or can be brushed, satin, matte, sandblasted, antiqued or oxidized (chemically blackened).

In order to be called sterling silver, a metal must be made up of a minimum of 92.5% pure silver and 7.5% alloy (meaning other metals), including but not limited to copper and nickel. The alloy is added to pure silver to make the metal more durable, tougher and harder. Sterling silver is designated a fineness of “925.” Pieces with sterling silver may be marked “sterling.”

Finishes on Sterling Silver
Finishing, or plating, is a common treatment with sterling silver. Popular types of plating are rhodium plating, gold plating and anti-tarnish plating. Plating is used to extend the life and sheen of the jewelry. After sizing or buffing a piece of jewelry with a machine, it must be re-plated to restore the finish.

  • Rhodium Plating: Rhodium plating is a complex and laborious process that enhances the luster and beauty and extends the life of silver. A member of the platinum metal group, rhodium is often used as a finishing touch on silver jewelry. It's a shiny silvery metal with a very white and reflective appearance, much like mercury. It's also very hard, so it withstands much wear and tear, resists natural tarnishing and wonderfully mimics the brilliant finish of freshly polished silver.

    Caring for Sterling Silver
    Sterling silver becomes tarnished as the result of a natural chemical process that occurs when sterling silver is exposed to chemicals in the air, rubber, wool and latex. Humidity also plays a role in accelerating tarnishing. It's easy to keep your sterling silver sparkling, though, by taking a few steps to prevent tarnish and other wear and tear.

  • Avoid exposing sterling silver to direct sunlight and harsh chemicals, including chlorine, ammonia, hair products, perfumes, cosmetics, perspiration and strong jewelry cleaning solutions.
  • Periodically wash sterling silver with mild dish soap and warm water. Rinse well and dry completely with a soft cloth before storing because moisture can cause tarnish.
  • Lightly polish sterling silver frequently with a soft silver-polishing cloth, avoiding abrasive cloths completely.
  • Tarnish is easy to remove when it first forms as a yellowish tint, but becomes more difficult to remove when it becomes brown and black. Remove tarnish with a silver polish cream, avoiding immersing pieces with gemstones in tarnish-removal solutions.
  • Minimize scratches on sterling silver by storing it in its own compartment in your jewelry box or in a cloth pouch. Sterling silver may also be stored in sealed polyethylene bags.

    Prasiolite:
    Prasiolite, also known as vermarine or praziolite, is a transparent green quartz. Quite rare in nature, most prasiolites on the market are heat treated amethysts, which is why they are sometimes called "green amethysts". Not all heated amethysts result in green hued prasiolites, however. Only amethysts from a few select locations, including Montezuma, Brazil and Arizona, will produce prasiolites when heat treated. Naturally occurring prasiolite has been reported in Poland.

    Prasiolite is considered by some to be a true collector's gemstone due to its rarity. Relatively inexpensive, its popularity has grown in recent years with large, clean, color saturated stones as the most valuable and desirable. The color of prasiolite can vary from light yellow-green to deep green, and can look similar to peridot and tourmaline. Ranking 7.0 on the Mohs Hardness Scale, prasiolite is ideal for everyday wear. Clean the stone with warm soapy water and a soft brush while keeping it away from household chemicals. Prolonged exposure to extreme heat or sunlight may cause damage and discoloration. Store your jewelry in a fabric lined box and away from other items and gemstones to avoid scratching.

    Derived from the Greek words, "prason" meaning leek, and "lithos" meaning stone, prasiolite was named for its vegetable colored stone appearance. Some believe prasiolite bridges the gap between physical and spiritual aspects of life and attracts prosperity by strengthening the mind and emotions.

    Earring Back Types


    The backing is an important part of an earring, providing a secure closure and comfortable fit. Keep in mind, some earring styles work better with certain back types. Experiment with the different types to find the best fit for you!

    Butterfly Back: A double looped piece resembling a butterfly that fits over a post. Variations on this design are called push back clasps. The basic post and butterfly back are usually used for stud earrings and lighter weight drop earrings.

    Hinged Snap Backs: This clasp features a hinged post that snaps into a groove on the back of the earring. It is commonly found on hoops. Sometimes the hinged post is curved to provide more room to fit around the ear, sometimes called a saddleback.

    Hook Backs: This earring backing is simply a long, bent post that fits through the piercing. Hooks have several variations, most notably the shepherd's hook and the French hook. While thin wire hooks reduce the weight of long earrings, making them more comfortable, they aren't as secure as other clasp styles.

    Lever Back: A hinged lever snaps shut against the curved post to form a closed loop around the ear lobe. This clasp is very secure and good for large or medium sized styles that drop just below the ear.

    Omega: Also called French clips, this clasp has a straight post and a looped lever. The hinged lever closes around the post and is held against the ear with pressure. The omega clasp is the most secure clasp, especially for the larger, heavier earrings.

    Screw back: This backing is a slight variation of the standard post and butterfly nut back. Instead of pushing on the back, the nut twists onto the threaded post. A screw back post design is often preferred for expensive diamond stud earrings that require increased security.