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Gem Insider® Sterling Silver Gemstone & White Topaz Oval Shaped Ring

Creative textures and colors combine to create an example of unmatched casual elegance! Whether it's your favorite jewel-tone work blazer or that go-to after-hours t-shirt and dark denim combo, this charming little ring will light up your look.

Round colorful opaque gemstone cabochons in your choice of color join sparkling white topaz accents to cover the entire oval top of this sterling silver ring. Flowing cut-out contours stack together on the upper shank to provide the perfect visual balance to the setting.

Details
  • Metal: Rhodium over sterling silver
  • Stone Information:
    Gemstone Choice: 14 round 4mm malachite, lapis lazuli, charoite or dyed black onyx cabochons
    White Topaz: Eight round modified-brilliant cut 1.5mm
  • Setting Type:
    Gemstone Choice: Prong/Adhesive
    White Topaz: Prong
  • Approximate Total Weight:
    White Topaz: 0.15ct
  • Measurements: 7/8"L x 13/16"W x 3/16"H
  • Collection: Gem Insider
  • Country of Origin: China

Check out the Ring Sizing Guide to find your ring size.

All weights pertaining to gemstones, including diamonds, are minimum weights. Additionally, please note that many gemstones are treated to enhance their beauty. View Gemstone Enhancements and Special Care Requirements for important information.

SterlingSilver    Onyx    LapisLazuli    Charoite    Malachite    

Sterling Silver

Sterling silver, also called fine silver, is a beautifully lustrous cool-toned precious metal favored in fine jewelry among other products. The most reflective of all metals (excluding mercury), sterling silver looks stunning by itself and brings out the best hues in an array of colorful gemstones.

Sterling silver can be polished to a higher sheen than platinum. In fact, Ag, the chemical symbol for silver, comes from a word that means “white and shining.” The surface of silver can boast that shiny, polished appearance, or can be brushed, satin, matte, sandblasted, antiqued or oxidized (chemically blackened).

In order to be called sterling silver, a metal must be made up of a minimum of 92.5% pure silver and 7.5% alloy (meaning other metals), including but not limited to copper and nickel. The alloy is added to pure silver to make the metal more durable, tougher and harder. Sterling silver is designated a fineness of “925.” Pieces with sterling silver may be marked “sterling.”

Finishes on Sterling Silver
Finishing, or plating, is a common treatment with sterling silver. Popular types of plating are rhodium plating, gold plating and anti-tarnish plating. Plating is used to extend the life and sheen of the jewelry. After sizing or buffing a piece of jewelry with a machine, it must be re-plated to restore the finish.

  • Rhodium Plating: Rhodium plating is a complex and laborious process that enhances the luster and beauty and extends the life of silver. A member of the platinum metal group, rhodium is often used as a finishing touch on silver jewelry. It's a shiny silvery metal with a very white and reflective appearance, much like mercury. It's also very hard, so it withstands much wear and tear, resists natural tarnishing and wonderfully mimics the brilliant finish of freshly polished silver.

    Caring for Sterling Silver
    Sterling silver becomes tarnished as the result of a natural chemical process that occurs when sterling silver is exposed to chemicals in the air, rubber, wool and latex. Humidity also plays a role in accelerating tarnishing. It's easy to keep your sterling silver sparkling, though, by taking a few steps to prevent tarnish and other wear and tear.

  • Avoid exposing sterling silver to direct sunlight and harsh chemicals, including chlorine, ammonia, hair products, perfumes, cosmetics, perspiration and strong jewelry cleaning solutions.
  • Periodically wash sterling silver with mild dish soap and warm water. Rinse well and dry completely with a soft cloth before storing because moisture can cause tarnish.
  • Lightly polish sterling silver frequently with a soft silver-polishing cloth, avoiding abrasive cloths completely.
  • Tarnish is easy to remove when it first forms as a yellowish tint, but becomes more difficult to remove when it becomes brown and black. Remove tarnish with a silver polish cream, avoiding immersing pieces with gemstones in tarnish-removal solutions.
  • Minimize scratches on sterling silver by storing it in its own compartment in your jewelry box or in a cloth pouch. Sterling silver may also be stored in sealed polyethylene bags.

    Onyx
    Onyx is a variety of chalcedony quartz that features a fine texture with a smooth black color. Some onyx can display white bands or ribbons against black or brown backgrounds. The bands that move through the stone run parallel and onyx is therefore sometimes known as zebra agate. Mined in Brazil, India, California and Uruguay, most onyx today is color-enhanced to increase its depth of color. It ranks a 6.5 on the Mohs Scale and is an ideal stone for carving. In fact, it is a favorite material of lapidary artists.

    Onyx was very popular with the ancient Greeks and Romans. The name comes from the Greek word "onux" which means fingernail. Legend says that one day frisky Cupid cut the divine fingernails of Venus with an arrowhead while she was sleeping. He left the clippings scattered on the sand and the fates turned them into stone so that no part of her heavenly body would ever perish. In Greek times, almost all colors of chalcedony were called onyx. Later, the Romans narrowed the term to refer to only the black and dark brown colors, while the reddish brown and white onyx became known as sardonyx. Highly valued in Rome, sardonyx was especially used for seals because it was said to never stick to the wax. Roman General Publius Cornelius Scipio was famous for wearing sardonyx.

    Worn during mourning in the Victorian age, onyx is now traditionally given as a 7th wedding anniversary gift. It is thought to increase happiness, self-control, courage, intuition and instincts. The stone is also believed to cool the yearnings of love and decrease sexual desire.

    Lapis
    Lapis is a strong blue microcrystalline rock composed primarily of the mineral lazurite. Its value decreases with the presence of white patches called calcite, while small veins of golden pyrite inclusions are often prized. Top quality lapis lazuli comes from Afghanistan, but small quantities are also found in Siberia, Chile, the United States, Pakistan and Canada. It is one of the most valuable semi-opaque stones and is a relatively soft gem, ranking 5.0-5.5 on the Mohs Scale.

    First mined in Afghanistan in 6000 B.C., lapis lazuli was used to heal eye maladies and was thought to help one acquire wisdom and serenity. The Romans believed it was a powerful aphrodisiac, while the Egyptians used lapis for cosmetic purposes and often carved it into vases and figurines. The ancient city of Ur had a thriving trade in lapis lazuli as early as the fourth millennium B.C. The name comes from the Latin word “lapis,” meaning stone, and from the Arabic word “azul,” meaning blue.

    In the Middle Ages, lapis was thought to free the soul from error, envy and fear. Used by artists during the Renaissance , ground lapis created a beautiful blue pigment for paintings. The stone was inlaid in the columns of St. Issac's Cathedral and the panels of the Pushkin Palace, both in Petersburg. Today, lapis lazuli is traditionally given as a 9th wedding anniversary gift. It is believed to free the wearer of melancholy and strengthen total awareness, creativity and ESP.

    Charoite
    Charoite was discovered in the Murun Mountains of Russia in 1978, and is still the only known location for this rare mineral. Its name is derived from the Charo River, which is near where the stone was found. Charoite has colors that range from bright lavender, violet and lilac to dark purple with white, gray and black veining. It is an unusual mineral with intriguing swirls and strands of fibrous material. With a hardness rating of 5.0-6.0 on the Mohs Scale, charoite is believed to enhance self-esteem and accelerate spiritual growth and the ability to love.

    Malachite
    Malachite is a stone that features light and dark green banded areas. Sleek and luxurious in texture, it contains natural black bands that vary from piece to piece, making it special and unique. Ancient Egyptians began mining it as early as 4000 BC! Malachite gems are found naturally combined with other minerals, such as chrysocolla. It's commonly found in Zaire, Russia, Germany, France, Chile, Australia and the southwestern United States. Considered the guardian stone of travelers, malachite is worn to detect danger and is believed to break into pieces when danger is near. Many believe malachite possesses the ability to calm the nerves. It is also known for creating peace, hope and success in business, as it can bring understanding and patience to those in its presence.

  • About the Collection
    Travel the lustrous world of genuine gemstones, exploring striking textures, vibrant colors and unexpected shapes. The Gem Insider® is your source for jewelry designed with truly distinctive gemstones. With a keen eye for quality and personality, EVINE Live gem expert and certified gemologist Paul Deasy voyages to the far reaches of the globe in search of the world's most unique stones.

    Experience the natural beauty and mesmerizing appeal of colorful, expertly-cut gemstones. Each ring, necklace, pendant and earring is designed to give you a look that is utterly original. Complemented with gold and silver, every design is crafted to last a lifetime.

    Grab your passport, fasten your seatbelt and get ready to explore the magnificent world of gemstones.

    Paul DeasyAbout the Guest
    Gem expert, author and TV veteran Paul Deasy is your professor and guide for this unique journey into the world of the exotics.

    Paul’s passion for gems goes back more than 20 years and is as radiant as any ruby, diamond or sapphire. Mr. Deasy’s unique expertise in gemstones was acquired the old fashioned way - through traveling the world extensively, attending industry trade shows, and filming in exotic locations, including Tanzania, Australia, Italy, Arizona and Nevada.

    Whether you’re a die-hard gemstone aficionado or a beginner who loves unique looks, you’re sure to enjoy Paul's enthusiasm, experience and eye for exotic gemstone style. 

    Friday, January 06
    • 12AM ET with Host
    • 3AM ET with Host
    • 6AM ET with Host
    • 11AM ET with Host
    • 3PM ET with Host
    • 10PM ET with Host
    Thursday, December 08
    • 8AM ET with Host WENDI RUSSO