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Le Amiche "Fall Fashion Girl" 14mm Bead Doll Charm Pendant w/ 31" Chain

When the seasons change, so should your accessories collection! This darling doll pendant dons a multicolor fall dress with chic heels and a cute purse for a classy and autumn-inspired look. Now all you need now to complete your look is a hot apple cider, cable knit sweater and pair of fringe booties!

If wearing her around your neck doesn't jive with your style, not to worry. Simply unhook her from the elongated chain with the lobster clasp and clip her onto your favorite handbag for fashionable flair!

Color Choices
  • Blue - Two-tone blue dress, a dyed black onyx bead with a silver-tone body
  • Green - Green, red and orange chevron dress, a dyed green agate bead with a silver-tone body
  • Marigold - Tan and orange chevron dress, a dyed brown Tiger's Eye bead with a gold-tone body
  • Lavender - Purple, brown and white houndstooth dress, a dyed purple agate bead with a gold-tone body
  • Light Pink - Black, tan and pink dress, a simulated pearl bead with a rose-tone body
  • Black - Houndstooth dress, a dyed black onyx bead with a silver-tone body
  • Tan - Black, tan, white and red plaid dress, a simulated pearl bead with a gold-tone body
  • Red - Red and blue chevron dress, a dyed black onyx bead with a gold-tone body
  • Metal: Gold-tone, rose-tone or silver-tone brass
  • Stone Information: One round full-drilled 14mm dyed onyx, dyed agate, dyed Tiger's Eye or simulated pearl bead
  • Setting: Pin
  • Measurements:
    Pendant: 4-3/16"L x 1-7/8"W x 1/2"H
    Chain: 31"L x 3/16"W
  • Chain Type: Oval Link
  • Clasp: Lobster
  • Collection: Le Amiche
  • Country of Origin: Italy

Please Note: The clasp connects the doll charm to the chain. The chain itself does not have a clasp.

All weights pertaining to gemstones, including diamonds, are minimum weights. Additionally, please note that many gemstones are treated to enhance their beauty. View Gemstone Enhancements and Special Care Requirements for important information.

California residents only: “Proposition 65” WARNING

Onyx is a variety of chalcedony quartz that features a fine texture with a smooth black color. Some onyx can display white bands or ribbons against black or brown backgrounds. The bands that move through the stone run parallel and onyx is therefore sometimes known as zebra agate. Mined in Brazil, India, California and Uruguay, most onyx today is color-enhanced to increase its depth of color. It ranks a 6.5 on the Mohs Scale and is an ideal stone for carving. In fact, it is a favorite material of lapidary artists.

Onyx was very popular with the ancient Greeks and Romans. The name comes from the Greek word "onux" which means fingernail. Legend says that one day frisky Cupid cut the divine fingernails of Venus with an arrowhead while she was sleeping. He left the clippings scattered on the sand and the fates turned them into stone so that no part of her heavenly body would ever perish. In Greek times, almost all colors of chalcedony were called onyx. Later, the Romans narrowed the term to refer to only the black and dark brown colors, while the reddish brown and white onyx became known as sardonyx. Highly valued in Rome, sardonyx was especially used for seals because it was said to never stick to the wax. Roman General Publius Cornelius Scipio was famous for wearing sardonyx.

Worn during mourning in the Victorian age, onyx is now traditionally given as a 7th wedding anniversary gift. It is thought to increase happiness, self-control, courage, intuition and instincts. The stone is also believed to cool the yearnings of love and decrease sexual desire.

Tiger's Eye:
Tiger’s eye received its name because it has rich yellow and golden brown bands resembling an eye of a tiger. The stone is a common form of brown quartz that has parallel stripes and lustrous colors. It comes in various, luminous shades of light or dark brown due to iron oxides. Tiger’s eye has the property of chatoyancy, meaning that when cut into a cabochon, it can shine with only a small ray of light on its surface, much like the eyes of a cat.

Also called crocidolite cat’s-eye or African cat’s-eye, the gem has a hardness of 7.0 on the Mohs Scale. Its most important deposit is in South Africa, though it is also found in western Australia, Myanmar (formerly Burma), India and California. Tiger’s eye has recently become a modern anniversary gemstone for the 9 th year of marriage.

Roman soldiers wore tiger’s eye for protection in battle and the stone is said to enhance courage and bring physical strength. Tiger’s eye is also believed to offer protection during travel and dispel negative energies. The gem is said to strengthen confidence, willpower and convictions, which in turn help people to accomplish goals, increase wealth and achieve a joyful outlook. Tiger’s eye is thought to help people recognize their inner power, leading them to attain their dreams and bring passion and vitality to their lives.

Perhaps tiger’s eye’s greatest folklore is that it is believed to promote mental clarity and balance. The gem is said to focus the mind and teach people to see with the eye of the tiger, clearly and without illusion. It is believed that tiger’s eye’s soothing vibrations can generate a calming effect that diminishes unclear thinking. The stone’s subtle energies are thought to bring order, stability and discipline to life. Tiger’s eye is closely attuned to Earth energies, but its yellow highlights are linked to the sun. Because it is believed to be a bridge between Earth and sky, it is considered a tool for balance between the physical and the spiritual. As a link between Father Sky and Mother Earth, the stone’s influence is thought to be one of harmony between yin and yang.

Found all over the world, agate has been creatively striped by nature. It is a type of chalcedony quartz that forms in concentric layers of colors and textures. Each individual agate forms by filling a cavity in a host rock. As a result, agate often is found as a round nodule with concentric bands like the rings of a tree trunk. Tiny quartz crystals called drusy (sometimes spelled as druzy) often form within the stone, adding to its beauty and uniqueness. Agate is a hard stone, within the range of 7.0-9.0 on the Mohs Scale.

In 1497, the mining of agate in the Nahe River valley in Germany gave rise to the cutting center of Idar-Oberstein. When the Nahe agate deposit was exhausted in the nineteenth century, Idar cutters started to develop the agate deposits of Brazil, discovering Brazil's rich deposits of many other gemstones. A famous collection of two to four thousand agate bowls, accumulated by Mithradates, King of Pontus, shows the popularity of agate at the time. Agate bowls were also popular in the Byzantine Empire. Collecting agate bowls became common among European royalty during the Renaissance and many museums in Europe, including the Louvre, have spectacular examples.

Although the small town of Idar-Oberstein is still known for the finest agate carving in the world, today Idar imports a huge range of other gem materials from around the world for cutting and carving in Germany. Cameo master carvers, modern lapidary artists and rough dealers flourish there, exporting their latest gem creations. It is an entire industry that grew from the desire for agate products during the Renaissance.

Agate was highly valued as a talisman or amulet in ancient times. It was said to quench thirst and protect from fevers. Persian magicians used agate to divert storms. Today, some believe that agate is a powerful emotional healer and helps people discern the truth.

Created or Simulated Gemstones: How are created or simulated gemstones different from natural gemstones? Natural gems are created by the forces of nature and must be discovered, usually by digging in the ground or sifting through a riverbed. When these stones are created in a laboratory, they are called created, simulated or synthetic gemstones.

The purpose of creating gemstones in a laboratory isn’t necessarily to reduce the cost, but also to produce larger, more perfectly consistent stones. Created or simulated gems can be made of any material. Synthetic gems, however, share virtually all chemical, optical and physical characteristics of their natural mineral counterparts.

Austrian Crystals: These are known for their excellent reflective quality and prismatic brilliance. This man-made crystal is created using natural minerals and quartz sand, which are then heated and slowly cooled using a process similar to that of creating hand-blown glass. This process creates an end product that can be fashioned into a beautiful crystal.

A special machine is used to create a highly faceted crystal. The crystals are cut in various directions, which allows for excellent light refraction, exceptional brilliance and unsurpassed color quality at an affordable price.

Today Swarovski® is one of the largest suppliers of high-end crystals. In the late 1800s, Daniel Swarovski invented a machine to cut crystal with extreme precision. He patented his technique and to this day, only select Swarovski family members and employees have unrestricted access to the production facility that creates these crystals. They are used to decorate everything from stilettos and sculptures, to chandeliers, jewelry and clothing.

About the Collection
Meet “Le Amiche,” a fun, flirty, fashion jewelry collection designed for dolls everywhere. Le Amiche, meaning ‘girlfriends,’ is produced in the Tuscan region of Italy by Opera, a manufacturer with a longstanding tradition of fine Italian workmanship. Each piece contains a fashion-forward doll motif, is accented with enamel, rhinestones and other unique trinkets, and comes finished with gold or rhodium plating. Fine, hand-woven Italian fabrics round out each bauble creating unique and original works of art throughout the collection.

Claire Kiecker About the Guest
International Jewelry Expert Claire Monetti has more than 20 years experience in the industry. Working in both product development and buying, she has an seasoned eye for high-end jewelry. Claire is a world traveler who is always on the lookout for the freshest and most fashionable designs from the international scene and she adores sharing the beauty and value of the finest jewelry with people from across the globe.