20% OFF all Jewelry purchases over $125 with coupon code: 20JEWELRY | 19 Days Until Christmas
Gems en Vogue Italy Carved Bamboo Coral Flower & Gemstone Cross Pendant w/ 18" Cable Chain

A beautiful way to keep faith close to your heart! Whether it's a statement of your commitment to spirit or just a way to add some color to your daily style, slip on this charming cross pendant and feel inspired. Salmon coral flowers decorate the two-tone arms and post while a single halo of black onyx or white agate highlights the center. A single bail accommodates the 18" chain.

Details
  • Metal: 18K yellow gold embraced™ sterling silver and palladium
  • Stone Information:
    Gemstone Choice: One donut shaped carved 20mm dyed black onyx or dyed white agate
    Dyed Salmon Bamboo Coral: Seven carved flower shaped 10mm
  • Setting Type: Cage, Prong/Adhesive
  • Measurements:
    Pendant: 3-3/16"L x 2"W x 1/2"H
    Chain: 18"L + 2" extender x 1.7mm W
  • Chain Type: Cable Link
  • Clasp: Lobster
  • Collection: Gems en Vogue Italy
  • Country of Origin: China/Vietnam

Please Note: Pendant can be removed from the chain.

Warranty: Limited one-year vendor warranty from the date of purchase. Please call 1-800-268-7962.

All weights pertaining to gemstones, including diamonds, are minimum weights. Additionally, please note that many gemstones are treated to enhance their beauty. View Gemstone Enhancements and Special Care Requirements for important information.

GoldoverSilver    Onyx    Coral    Agate    PalladiumSilver    

Vermeil Plating:
Pronounced "vermay," vermeil is an electroplating process in which 14K gold or higher is coated over sterling silver. Officially designated by the jewelry industry, items may only be sold as vermeil if they have a minimum thickness of 100 millionths of an inch (2.5 microns) of gold over the silver. Regular gold plating is less than 2.5 microns.

The "vermeil" technique of plating sterling silver with gold originated in France in the 1750s. It differs from "gold filled" or "gold plated" in terms of the thickness or thinness of the microns over sterling silver. "Gold filled" pieces have a much thicker layer, between 15 and 45 microns, which is mechanically bonded to the base metal with heat and pressure. Vermeil is a more expensive version of "gold plated". It does not wear off as quickly as gold plating does. However, over time, vermeil wears off and therefore will require re-plating.

Gold/Platinum Embraced Silver or Bronze:
Our platinum and gold embraced collections feature layers of platinum or gold over sterling silver or bronze for a lustrous, radiant finish everywhere you look and touch.

To care for your plated jewelry items:

  • Remove jewelry before bathing, swimming, washing hands, putting on make-up, lotions, perfumes, and/or working with household chemicals, cleaners, or acidic liquids.
  • Do not clean plated jewelry in an ultrasonic cleaner or in silver cleaning solutions, as it could completely remove the plating finish from your item.
  • Ensure your jewelry item is thoroughly dry before storing. Moisture in an enclosed space can increase tarnishing.
  • Store your plated jewelry in a jewelry box lined with felt or anti-tarnish material. Items should not be stacked as this may cause damage to the plating surface.
  • Do not use excessive pressure when cleaning with a polishing cloth or soft brush, as this may cause damage to the plating.
  • Over time your plated items will need to be re-plated. Contact your local jeweler for information on plating services.

    Onyx
    Onyx is a variety of chalcedony quartz that features a fine texture with a smooth black color. Some onyx can display white bands or ribbons against black or brown backgrounds. The bands that move through the stone run parallel and onyx is therefore sometimes known as zebra agate. Mined in Brazil, India, California and Uruguay, most onyx today is color-enhanced to increase its depth of color. It ranks a 6.5 on the Mohs Scale and is an ideal stone for carving. In fact, it is a favorite material of lapidary artists.

    Onyx was very popular with the ancient Greeks and Romans. The name comes from the Greek word "onux" which means fingernail. Legend says that one day frisky Cupid cut the divine fingernails of Venus with an arrowhead while she was sleeping. He left the clippings scattered on the sand and the fates turned them into stone so that no part of her heavenly body would ever perish. In Greek times, almost all colors of chalcedony were called onyx. Later, the Romans narrowed the term to refer to only the black and dark brown colors, while the reddish brown and white onyx became known as sardonyx. Highly valued in Rome, sardonyx was especially used for seals because it was said to never stick to the wax. Roman General Publius Cornelius Scipio was famous for wearing sardonyx.

    Worn during mourning in the Victorian age, onyx is now traditionally given as a 7th wedding anniversary gift. It is thought to increase happiness, self-control, courage, intuition and instincts. The stone is also believed to cool the yearnings of love and decrease sexual desire.

    Coral
    Most people think the coral used in jewelry comes from South Pacific coral reefs such as the Great Barrier Reef off Australia. However, these coral reefs are formed by a different species than the coral that is traditionally used in jewelry. Most jewelry coral is found in the Mediterranean Sea or in the Pacific near Japan and Taiwan. It grows in ocean colonies of branches that look like underwater trees, and is found in a range of colors, including pale pink (called angelskin coral), orange, red (called noble coral), white and black. The most valued colors are deep red, black and pink. It is much softer than other gems, with a hardness of only 3.5 on the Mohs Scale. In jewelry-making, coral is often carved into beads or cameos, or can be left and polished in its natural branch-like form.

    Among the most ancient of gem materials, coral has been used for adornment since prehistoric times. While coral inlays and ornaments have been found in Celtic tombs from the Iron Age, the gem also has a history of religious significance. It is one of the seven treasures in Buddhist scriptures, and coral rosaries are used by Tibetan Lamas.

    Coral was long thought to be a powerful talisman that could protect from evil spirits and ward off hurricanes. Because it was believed that coral protected the wearer, it was a traditional gift to children. Coral was also believed to lose its powers once broken. Today, coral is the traditional 35th anniversary gift for married couples.

    Agate
    Found all over the world, agate has been creatively striped by nature. It is a type of chalcedony quartz that forms in concentric layers of colors and textures. Each individual agate forms by filling a cavity in a host rock. As a result, agate often is found as a round nodule with concentric bands like the rings of a tree trunk. Tiny quartz crystals called drusy (sometimes spelled as druzy) often form within the stone, adding to its beauty and uniqueness. Agate is a hard stone, within the range of 7.0-9.0 on the Mohs Scale.

    In 1497, the mining of agate in the Nahe River valley in Germany gave rise to the cutting center of Idar-Oberstein. When the Nahe agate deposit was exhausted in the nineteenth century, Idar cutters started to develop the agate deposits of Brazil, discovering Brazil's rich deposits of many other gemstones. A famous collection of two to four thousand agate bowls, accumulated by Mithradates, King of Pontus, shows the popularity of agate at the time. Agate bowls were also popular in the Byzantine Empire. Collecting agate bowls became common among European royalty during the Renaissance and many museums in Europe, including the Louvre, have spectacular examples.

    Although the small town of Idar-Oberstein is still known for the finest agate carving in the world, today Idar imports a huge range of other gem materials from around the world for cutting and carving in Germany. Cameo master carvers, modern lapidary artists and rough dealers flourish there, exporting their latest gem creations. It is an entire industry that grew from the desire for agate products during the Renaissance.

    Agate was highly valued as a talisman or amulet in ancient times. It was said to quench thirst and protect from fevers. Persian magicians used agate to divert storms. Today, some believe that agate is a powerful emotional healer and helps people discern the truth.

    Palladium:
    A selection of our jewelry is made of sterling palladium alloy. Palladium is a member of the platinum group of precious metals. By replacing a portion of the copper content used in standard sterling silver with palladium, this proprietary formula renders a precious metal with superior performance attributes. Sterling palladium is five times more tarnish-resistant than standard sterling silver and has strength similar to that of 14K gold.

    Palladium has been used as a precious metal in jewelry since 1939, originally as an alternative to platinum for making white gold. Its naturally white color requires no rhodium plating. Additionally, palladium is proportionally much lighter than platinum and is ideal for use in heavier gemstone jewelry. It is a more expensive alloy than nickel, but it seldom causes the allergic reactions that nickel alloy can.

    To care for your plated jewelry items:

  • Remove jewelry before bathing, swimming, washing hands, putting on make-up, lotions, perfumes, and/or working with household chemicals, cleaners, or acidic liquids.
  • Do not clean plated jewelry in an ultrasonic cleaner or in silver cleaning solutions, as it could completely remove the plating finish from your item.
  • Ensure your jewelry item is thoroughly dry before storing. Moisture in an enclosed space can increase tarnishing.
  • Store your plated jewelry in a jewelry box lined with felt or anti-tarnish material. Items should not be stacked as this may cause damage to the plating surface.
  • Do not use excessive pressure when cleaning with a polishing cloth or soft brush, as this may cause damage to the plating.
  • Over time your plated items will need to be re-plated. Contact your local jeweler for information on plating services.

  • About the Collection
    Fall in love with Gems en Vogue jewelry - a EVINE Live-exclusive collection featuring vintage, European design in every hand-set genuine gemstone piece.

    Crafted by a select team of designers, this collection is deeply inspired by influential art movements from Art Deco to the French Renaissance, resulting in a gorgeous blend of historic and modern style. Each signature piece is intricately designed with rare, exotic or select genuine gemstones and masterfully set in sterling palladium alloy with rich 18K Gold Embraced accents.

    Always at the forefront of innovation, the proprietary formula of Gems en Vogue's sterling palladium alloy jewelry provides increased tarnish resistance and strength at affordable sterling silver prices.

    Discover the luxury of statement gemstone jewelry with Gems en Vogue.

    Michael Valitutti

    About the Guest
    Michael Valitutti is a graduate gemologist having worked more than 30 years in the jewelry business. He is a die hard gem enthusiast specializing in gemstone sourcing and design.

    In 1998, Michael joined EVINE Live and has been traveling the world in search of exciting, premium gemstones for the Gems en Vogue collection ever since. From the rare and exotic to the precious and semi-precious, he has featured over one hundred gemstone varieties from over fifteen different countries.

    With a passion for shine and talent for design, Guest Michael Valitutti G.G. (GIA), winner of two design competitions, was born to bring to you a stunning collection unlike any other.

    Friday, January 06
    • 6PM ET with Host
    Saturday, January 07
    • 1PM ET with Host
    Monday, January 09
    • 9AM ET with Host
    Tuesday, January 10
    • 11PM ET with Host
    Wednesday, January 11
    • 2AM ET with Host
    • 7AM ET with Host
    • 12AM ET with Host
    • 3AM ET with Host
    • 6AM ET with Host
    Wednesday, December 07
    • 8AM ET with Host Sam Simmons Browse Items
    • 5AM ET with Host
    Thursday, December 08
    Wednesday, December 21
    • 2AM ET with Host LYNNE SCHACHER
    • 3PM ET with Host MELISSA MINER
    Saturday, January 28
    • 1PM ET with Host
    • 2PM ET with Host
    • 3PM ET with Host
    Thursday, January 05
    • 9AM ET with Host
    Tuesday, December 20
    • 4PM ET with Host MELISSA MINER
    • 5PM ET with Host MELISSA MINER
    Tuesday, December 06