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Sunwest Silver 1.75" 20 x 15mm Oval Ceruleite Drop Earrings

Splash on the compelling color! Double drops of rich blue ceruleite should do it. It's the kind of blue that looks like the window to another world. Just like you could step through it and arrive in a totally different place. Well, what are you waiting for? Step on through.

Each Southwest-inspired, oxidized sterling silver earring hosts one large oval ceruleite cabochon in a north-south orientation at the center. Rope, star and shell motifs decorate the edges of the settings. French hooks give the dangles the freedom to do their thing.

Details
  • Metal: Oxidized sterling silver
  • Stone Information: Two oval 20 x 15mm stabilized ceruleite cabochons
  • Setting Type: Bezel/Adhesive
  • Measurements: 1-7/8"L x 15/16"W x 1/4"H
  • Backing: Hook with rubber stopper
  • Collection: Sunwest Silver
  • Country of Origin: USA

Stabilized gemstones are enhanced through a process of coating the genuine gemstone with colorless acrylics or resin to fill porous gaps, harden the stone and maintain the stone’s color.

All weights pertaining to gemstones, including diamonds, are minimum weights. Additionally, please note that many gemstones are treated to enhance their beauty. View Gemstone Enhancements and Special Care Requirements for important information.

SterlingSilver    Drops    

Sterling Silver

Sterling silver, also called fine silver, is a beautifully lustrous cool-toned precious metal favored in fine jewelry among other products. The most reflective of all metals (excluding mercury), sterling silver looks stunning by itself and brings out the best hues in an array of colorful gemstones.

Sterling silver can be polished to a higher sheen than platinum. In fact, Ag, the chemical symbol for silver, comes from a word that means “white and shining.” The surface of silver can boast that shiny, polished appearance, or can be brushed, satin, matte, sandblasted, antiqued or oxidized (chemically blackened).

In order to be called sterling silver, a metal must be made up of a minimum of 92.5% pure silver and 7.5% alloy (meaning other metals), including but not limited to copper and nickel. The alloy is added to pure silver to make the metal more durable, tougher and harder. Sterling silver is designated a fineness of “925.” Pieces with sterling silver may be marked “sterling.”

Finishes on Sterling Silver
Finishing, or plating, is a common treatment with sterling silver. Popular types of plating are rhodium plating, gold plating and anti-tarnish plating. Plating is used to extend the life and sheen of the jewelry. After sizing or buffing a piece of jewelry with a machine, it must be re-plated to restore the finish.

  • Rhodium Plating: Rhodium plating is a complex and laborious process that enhances the luster and beauty and extends the life of silver. A member of the platinum metal group, rhodium is often used as a finishing touch on silver jewelry. It's a shiny silvery metal with a very white and reflective appearance, much like mercury. It's also very hard, so it withstands much wear and tear, resists natural tarnishing and wonderfully mimics the brilliant finish of freshly polished silver.

    Caring for Sterling Silver
    Sterling silver becomes tarnished as the result of a natural chemical process that occurs when sterling silver is exposed to chemicals in the air, rubber, wool and latex. Humidity also plays a role in accelerating tarnishing. It's easy to keep your sterling silver sparkling, though, by taking a few steps to prevent tarnish and other wear and tear.

  • Avoid exposing sterling silver to direct sunlight and harsh chemicals, including chlorine, ammonia, hair products, perfumes, cosmetics, perspiration and strong jewelry cleaning solutions.
  • Periodically wash sterling silver with mild dish soap and warm water. Rinse well and dry completely with a soft cloth before storing because moisture can cause tarnish.
  • Lightly polish sterling silver frequently with a soft silver-polishing cloth, avoiding abrasive cloths completely.
  • Tarnish is easy to remove when it first forms as a yellowish tint, but becomes more difficult to remove when it becomes brown and black. Remove tarnish with a silver polish cream, avoiding immersing pieces with gemstones in tarnish-removal solutions.
  • Minimize scratches on sterling silver by storing it in its own compartment in your jewelry box or in a cloth pouch. Sterling silver may also be stored in sealed polyethylene bags.

    Earring Back Types


    The backing is an important part of an earring, providing a secure closure and comfortable fit. Keep in mind, some earring styles work better with certain back types. Experiment with the different types to find the best fit for you!

    Butterfly Back: A double looped piece resembling a butterfly that fits over a post. Variations on this design are called push back clasps. The basic post and butterfly back are usually used for stud earrings and lighter weight drop earrings.

    Hinged Snap Backs: This clasp features a hinged post that snaps into a groove on the back of the earring. It is commonly found on hoops. Sometimes the hinged post is curved to provide more room to fit around the ear, sometimes called a saddleback.

    Hook Backs: This earring backing is simply a long, bent post that fits through the piercing. Hooks have several variations, most notably the shepherd's hook and the French hook. While thin wire hooks reduce the weight of long earrings, making them more comfortable, they aren't as secure as other clasp styles.

    Lever Back: A hinged lever snaps shut against the curved post to form a closed loop around the ear lobe. This clasp is very secure and good for large or medium sized styles that drop just below the ear.

    Omega: Also called French clips, this clasp has a straight post and a looped lever. The hinged lever closes around the post and is held against the ear with pressure. The omega clasp is the most secure clasp, especially for the larger, heavier earrings.

    Screw back: This backing is a slight variation of the standard post and butterfly nut back. Instead of pushing on the back, the nut twists onto the threaded post. A screw back post design is often preferred for expensive diamond stud earrings that require increased security.

  • About the Collection
    Known for their legacy of creating fine Navajo and Pueblo jewelry, Sunwest Silver isn't just a jewelry company, they're a family. Their artisans have been dedicated to their work and company for decades and they're paying it forward by teaching the next generation their craft, trade and traditions. The spirited people of Sunwest Silver take pride in hand-tooling each peace to share with everyone who appreciates family, fine jewelry and fun.

    Crafted in the United States, Sunwest Silver designs are adorned with some of the most colorful and rare turquoise from one of the largest private collections in the world. With hues ranging from sky blue to lime green, Sunwest Silver's wide variety of stones are culled either from one of their five proprietary mines or from the hand-curated stores they've gathered over the last two decades from now depleted mines.

    If you love Native American jewelry, appreciate family, fine craftsmanship and the story behind the stones, you'll not find a better collection than that from the proud people of Sunwest Silver.

    Sarina Godin

    Sarina Godin About the Guest
    No stranger to Evine, Paul Deasy is gem expert, author and TV veteran who serves as your gemstone professor and guide. Paul's passion for gems goes back more than 20 years, over which he's traveled the world to learn just about everything there is to about the history, science and culture of gemstones. He's an industry tradeshow regular, and has studied in the most exotic and interesting regions, including Tanzania, Australia, Italy and much, much more.

    Whether you're a die-hard gemstone collector or a beginner who loves a unique look, you're sure to enjoy Paul's enthusiasm, experience and eye for gemstone style.

    As a Native American raised by silversmiths, Valerie Calabaza's passion for Southwestern & Native American jewelry grew with her into adulthood, leading her to begin designing and creating jewelry of her own.

    Valerie is proud to share her culture, traditions and passion for Native American jewelry as a part of the Sunwest Silver family.