Gem Treasures® 14K Gold 1.76ctw Apatite, London Blue Topaz & White Zircon Ring

Sparkle splashed elegance! Ready to be ravishing on an elegant evening out, this refined and detailed ring puts rich color and brilliant shimmer on full display. Bright and bold and meant to capture attention, each movement of the ring on your hand will bring renewed interest in you and what you're all about.

One large oval cut apatite takes center stage in a north south setting at the center of this polished 14K gold ring. Flickering blue topaz accents flank the east and west sides of the apatite. Glistening white topaz gemstones circle the setting edge and travel down the upper sides of the shank providing a smoldering complement to the featured stone. Slip it on with ease and wear with comfort thanks to the full undergallery.

  • Metal: 14K Gold
  • Stone Information:
    Apatite: One oval cut 9.5 x 7.5mm
    White Zircon: Various round modified-brilliant cut 1mm
    Blue Topaz: Two round modified-brilliant cut 1.5mm
  • Setting Type: Prong
  • Approximate Total Weight:
    Apatite: 1.40ct
    White Zircon: 0.32ct
    Blue Topaz: 0.03ct
  • Measurements: 7/16"L x 13/16"W x 1/4"H
  • Collection: Gem Treasures
  • Country of Origin: India

Check out the Ring Sizing Guide to find your ring size.

All weights pertaining to gemstones, including diamonds, are minimum weights. Additionally, please note that many gemstones are treated to enhance their beauty. View Gemstone Enhancements and Special Care Requirements for important information.

YellowGold    14KGold    Topaz    Apatite    

Yellow Gold
By far the most common color of gold used in jewelry, yellow gold is gold in its natural shade. Yellow gold is usually alloyed with copper and silver to increase the strength of the metal. How yellow the metal is depends upon the content of gold. A 14-karat piece of jewelry will have a brighter yellow hue than a 10-karat piece. Likewise, an 18-karat piece of jewelry will have a deeper yellow than 14-karat gold, and so on.

Gold Karat
Gold's softness and malleability make it a wonderful metal to work with when creating virtually any design in jewelry. But this softness can be a drawback as well. To make it stronger and more durable, gold is usually alloyed, or mixed, with other metals such as copper or silver. The higher a metal's percentage of gold content, the softer and more yellow the jewelry piece. The karat weight system used to measure gold in a piece is the same for all hues, including white and yellow gold.

The word “carat” is Arabic, meaning “bean seed.” This is because historically seeds were used to measure weights of gold and precious stones. In the United States, “karat” with a “k” is used to measure gold's purity, while “carat” with a “c” is used in measuring a gemstone's size. The karat mark of gold represents the percentage of pure gold to alloy.

  • 24K is pure gold or 100% gold
  • 21K is 21/24ths gold content or 87.5% gold: In the United States, jewelry with this karatage or higher is rare. It is far more common in Europe, the Middle East and Southeast Asia.
  • 18K is 18/24ths gold content or 75% gold: This karatage is a popular high-end choice in the United States, Europe and other regions. Its popularity is spreading throughout North America.
  • 14K is 14/24ths gold content or 58.5% gold: This is the most common gold karatage in the United States because of its fine balance between gold content, durability and affordability.
  • 10K is 10/24ths gold content or 41.7% gold: This karatage is gaining popularity for its affordability and durability. Commonly used in everyday-wear jewelry such as rings, 10K gold beautifully withstands wear and tear. It is the lowest gold content that can be legally marked or sold as gold jewelry in the United States.

    In order to determine the karat weight of a specific item, simply look for the quality mark. Jewelry items will bear the stamp of their karatage based upon the United States or European system of marking. The United States system designates pieces by their karats—24K, 18K, 14K, 10K, etc. The European system designates pieces by their percentage of gold content. For instance, 10K gold is marked “417,” denoting 41.7% gold; 14K is marked “585,” denoting 58.5% gold; and 18K is marked “750,” denoting 75% gold; etc.

    A symbol of strength and intelligence, topaz derives its name from Topazios, an island in the Red Sea that is known today as Zabargad. The Greek word “topazios” means “to seek,” since the island was covered with a thick fog and difficult to find. Gemstones found on the island were called topaz, although the stones were eventually found to actually be peridot. The real gem of topaz is found throughout the world, with different occurrences producing specific colors.

    Brown, yellow, orange and red topaz are found in Brazil, Sri Lanka and Siberia. Most brownish topaz is heated to produce a permanent and glamorous pink color. Following the discovery of pink topaz in Russia during the 19th century, Imperial topaz was found. Featuring a sherry red, deep pink or reddish-orange color, the gem was so coveted that its ownership was restricted to the Czar, his family and those who received it as a royal gift. Today, Imperial shades are the most rare and, therefore, the most valuable.

    Blue topaz is rarely found in nature and is most often created through a combination of heat treatment and irradiation. It is found in Brazil, Sri Lanka, Nigeria and China. Topaz is often colorless, too, and can be found in the United States, Mexico, Russia and Pakistan. In 1998, a new type of enhanced topaz made its appearance with a greenish-blue or emerald green color. All colors of topaz rank an 8.0 on the Mohs Scale of hardness.

    Yellow topaz is November’s birthstone and blue topaz is December’s birthstone. Blue topaz is also the traditional gift for 4th and 19th wedding anniversaries, while Imperial topaz is celebrated as a 23rd anniversary gift. Perhaps the most famous topaz is a large, colorless stone known as the Braganza. It was discovered in Brazil in 1740 and was originally thought to be a priceless diamond. Today, the giant 1,680.00ct stone is set in the Portuguese Crown.

    The mystery and allure of topaz goes back thousands of years. To the ancients, it was a symbol of love and affection and was thought to ward off sudden death. The Romans associated topaz with Jupiter, the god of the sun. The Greeks called it the Stone of Strength, believing it had the power to increase strength and make its wearer invisible in times of emergency. The Egyptians said the gem was colored with the golden glow of the sun god, Ra, making topaz a powerful amulet that protected its wearer against harm.

    Topaz' mystical curative powers were believed to wax and wane with the phases of the moon. The gem was said to change color in the presence of poisoned food or drink and falcons were carved on the stones to help earn the goodwill of kings and magnates.

    Today, topaz is said to be the gem that has the widest range of curative powers. It is believed to dispel enchantment and protect against negative emotions such as anger, fear, greed and envy. Its properties are supposedly enhanced when the gem is mounted in gold. Because of this association with gold, topaz is used to bring or enhance the wearer's money-gathering abilities and has long been used in money and wealth rituals.

    Wearing topaz is said to improve and deepen relationships, promote patience, ensure fidelity and enhance the ability to love. The gem is also believed to bring friendship, intelligence, long life, beauty and a pleasant disposition.

    The name apatite comes from a Greek word "apatos," meaning deception, which alludes to the mineral's similarity with other more valuable minerals such as olivine, peridot and beryl. It can be transparent to opaque, with color that is typically green but can also be yellow, blue, reddish brown, violet and colorless. This gem exhibits an unusual "partially dissolved" look similar to the look of previously sucked-on hard candy.

    Apatite is widely distributed in all rock types, but is usually just found as small grains or fragments. Large and well-formed crystals, though, can be found in certain contact metamorphic rocks; but with a hardness of 5.0 on the Mohs Scale, the softness of apatite prevents wide distribution in the jewelry market. Apatite occurs generally in rather rough prismatic crystals, the largest being 4 inches long and 1 inch in diameter.

    In most limestone quarries, careful search shows the presence of small prisms of bright green apatite in the limestone. Notable occurrences include Germany, Brazil, Russia, Myanmar (Burma), Sri Lanka (Ceylon), Canada, East Africa, Sweden, Spain and Mexico.

  • About the Collection
    Experience the colorful allure of Gem Treasures® - uniquely created gemstone jewelry designed to make a personal statement. Created with eye-catching details set in 14K gold or silver with brilliant gemstone accents, Gem Treasures adds a splash of color and pinch of panache to any look. By offering a full spectrum of gemstones, you can flawlessly embellish your current collection or use these pieces as a trendy foundation for a new collection.

    Eye-catching semi-precious gemstones frame each Gem Treasures piece in a multitude of designs and styles. Many designs use large center stones accented by diamonds and exotic stones, for maximum flair. Every item has a unique touch; whether you are looking for an exceptional topaz ring, a stunning aquamarine pendant or a charming tourmaline statement piece.

    Learn the secrets behind this beautiful assortment with guest and gem expert Chuck Clemency, whose engaging and dynamic personality brings out the best in gemstone jewelry. Share in his passion for the beauty of gemstones and discover your perfect jewelry counterpart. Share a laugh with Chuck as you make a bold personal statement with Gem Treasures Jewelry.

    Chuck ClemencyAbout the Guest
    Guest and jewelry expert Chuck Clemency began his career in jewelry in a rather interesting way. In 1976, he walked into a retail store that had two openings–one in sporting goods and one in jewelry. Taking note of Chuck's lime green suit, the manager thought Chuck would be perfect for the jewelry department. The rest is history!

    Chuck prides himself on the affordability of his products. He says what makes them really stand out from crowd are the expensive looks he offers at tremendous values. Chuck is most inspired by the enjoyment his designs add to his customers' lives.

    Personal Jeweler Warranty Program
    Warranty services are available for all Gem Treasures items purchased on or after February 1, 2016. Items will be covered for a period of one year from the invoice date noted on your EVINE Live receipt. The Personal Jewelry service offers coverage for stone loss, breakage, manufacturer defects and free sizing for sterling silver or gold sizable rings. For more information on the Personal Jeweler Warranty Program, please call 1-844-752-4825.