LAST MINUTE BEEKMAN 1802 | Stock up with 6 ValuePay® payments on virtually everything
global strip12 Days of Christmas: Day 4 | 20% OFF Beekman 1802 orders of $75+ with the Evine CardGuaranteed Christmas Delivery - Learn More
Le Amiche 14mm Agate Bead "Ballerina Girl" Charm Pendant w/ 30" Chain

If you want a charm that's en pointe, let this pretty ballerina pirouette her way into your jewelry box! Featuring dangling limbs, a puffy pink tutu and a vibrant fuchsia agate bead for a head, this tiny dancer is twirling with a hoop in her pink enamel shoes. You can also unclip her from the elongated chain and put her on your purse or cell phone!

Details
  • Metal: Rhodium over brass
  • Stone Information: One round full-drilled 14mm agate
  • Setting: Pin
  • Measurements:
    Pendant: 4-3/16"L x 1-11/16"W x 1/2"H
    Chain: 30"L
  • Chain Type: Oval Link
  • Clasp: Lobster
  • Collection: Le Amiche
  • Country of Origin: Italy

Please Note: Lobster clasp is located on the pendant, not the chain.

All weights pertaining to gemstones, including diamonds, are minimum weights. Additionally, please note that many gemstones are treated to enhance their beauty. View Gemstone Enhancements and Special Care Requirements for important information.

California residents only: “Proposition 65” WARNING

Agate    

Agate
Found all over the world, agate has been creatively striped by nature. It is a type of chalcedony quartz that forms in concentric layers of colors and textures. Each individual agate forms by filling a cavity in a host rock. As a result, agate often is found as a round nodule with concentric bands like the rings of a tree trunk. Tiny quartz crystals called drusy (sometimes spelled as druzy) often form within the stone, adding to its beauty and uniqueness. Agate is a hard stone, within the range of 7.0-9.0 on the Mohs Scale.

In 1497, the mining of agate in the Nahe River valley in Germany gave rise to the cutting center of Idar-Oberstein. When the Nahe agate deposit was exhausted in the nineteenth century, Idar cutters started to develop the agate deposits of Brazil, discovering Brazil's rich deposits of many other gemstones. A famous collection of two to four thousand agate bowls, accumulated by Mithradates, King of Pontus, shows the popularity of agate at the time. Agate bowls were also popular in the Byzantine Empire. Collecting agate bowls became common among European royalty during the Renaissance and many museums in Europe, including the Louvre, have spectacular examples.

Although the small town of Idar-Oberstein is still known for the finest agate carving in the world, today Idar imports a huge range of other gem materials from around the world for cutting and carving in Germany. Cameo master carvers, modern lapidary artists and rough dealers flourish there, exporting their latest gem creations. It is an entire industry that grew from the desire for agate products during the Renaissance.

Agate was highly valued as a talisman or amulet in ancient times. It was said to quench thirst and protect from fevers. Persian magicians used agate to divert storms. Today, some believe that agate is a powerful emotional healer and helps people discern the truth.