Passage to Israel™ Sterling Silver Garnet Accented Watch Pendant w/ 24" Chain

Take time to tell time with this beautiful neck piece! Crafted in oxidized sterling silver, this snake chain necklace features an upside down watch so you can keep track of your precious time. Silver dot markers can be found at every hour except for Roman numerals at 6:00 and 12:00. You'll also find one round cabochon 4.75mm garnet surrounded by four round cabochon 2 -2.75mm garnets all in adhesive settings.

The total approximate garnet weight is 0.80ct. The necklace measures 24"L and the pendant is 1-7/8"L x 1-1/8"W. Completed with a lobster clasp.

  • Movement: Japanese Quartz
  • Crystal: Mineral
  • Crown: Push/pull
  • Water Resistance: 3 ATM - 30 Meters - 100 Feet

    To view the actual case size, Click Here.

    Part of the Passage to Israel™ Collection. Made in Israel. All weights pertaining to gemstones, including diamonds, are minimum weights. Additionally, please note that many gemstones are treated to enhance their beauty. Click here for important information about gemstone enhancements and special care requirements.

  • Watch Glossary:

    ATM: Measures water resistance; Stands for "atmospheres" or the amount of pressure a watch can withstand before leaking; One atmosphere is equal to 10 meters of water pressure.

    Bezel: Retaining ring topping the case and securing the crystal; Sometimes incorporates unidirectional or ratcheting movements, engraved or printed chapter markers, or complications such as a tachymeter.

    Chronograph: Functioning similarly to a stopwatch, a chronograph is a unique and valued complication due to its ability to measure increments of elapsed time while the watch still maintains traditional timekeeping abilities. The crown controls the analog watch while function pushers allow you to start, stop and reset the chronograph subdials.

    Chronometer: High-precision timepiece that has been tested and is certified to meet precision standards; Chronometer watches often come with certificates indicating their certified status.

    Complication: Any feature added to the timepiece that does not indicate hours, minutes or seconds.

    COSC Certified Chronometer: Refers to timepieces that have been christened with the title of chronometer. To become a chronometer, timepieces have to pass a test conducted by the Controle Officiel Suisse des Chronometers (COSC), roughly translating to Official Swiss Chronometer Testing Institute. COSC is a prestigious Swiss government agency that certifies the accuracy and precision of timepieces in Switzerland.

    Crown: Part that allows you to manipulate the watch movement for a variety of purposes such as setting the hands, changing the date, winding the mainspring, etc.

    Crystal: Transparent cover on a watch face that gives view of the dial.

    Deployant: Type of clasp that keeps the closing mechanism hidden, creating an uninterrupted look for your bracelet or strap.

    Dual Time Zone: Timepiece that simultaneously gives time in two time zones. GMT function serves the same purpose and is used interchangeably, as it can be set to any time zone you wish.

    Exhibition Case or Back: Unique complication wherein a crystal window is implemented into the back of a watch case, allowing view of the timepiece's movement.

    Function Pushers: Manual controls on a case for when a movement features complications that require increased manipulation.

    Greenwich Mean Time (GMT): Also referred to as Greenwich Meridian Time, the Greenwich Meridian Line is located at the Royal Observatory in Greenwich, England. It is the place from where all time zones are measured. Greenwich Mean Time is the average time that Earth takes to rotate from noon to noon. In this regard, GMT is thought of as "the world's time" and was once the basis with which every other zone set time.

    Guilloche: Style of engraving that features wavy or straight lines, giving a unique effect when the timepiece is moved or shifted.

    Ionic Plating: Process that produces a hardened surface that is durable and scratch-resistant; Has a black flat "stealth" finish.

    Jewels: Within a movement, metal on metal contact creates wear and tear. Watchmakers use jewel bearings to reduce friction and help the delicate parts of the movement work smoothly and with great precision. Jewels help extend the movement's life. Diamonds, sapphires, rubies and garnets are the preferred materials. As a general rule, a higher number of jewels suggests a more prestigious movement.

    Lugs: North and south ends of the case that attach to the strap or bracelet and often extend out from the dominant lines of the case.

    Moon Phase: The lunar cycle has been a cornerstone of horology, the study of measuring time, since ancient days. Moon Phase is a complication on a timepiece that displays the various stages of the moon cycles from waxing to waning. It appears as a dial visible through an aperture which reveals the current moon phase.

    Movement: Assembly making up the principal elements and mechanisms of a watch or clock; Includes the winding and setting mechanism, the mainspring, the train, the escapement and the regulating elements.

    Power Reserve: Time a watch will continue running based on the movement's residual winding of its mainspring; In quartz and digital watches, this can also refer to the amount of energy left in the battery.

    Push Button Dual Deployant: Similar to deployant and considered one of the most desirable and easy-to-use clasps, the push button dual deployant employs two small hidden push buttons that release the bracelet. This clasp keeps the closing mechanism hidden for an uninterrupted, seamless finish.

    Repeater: Complex watch mechanism that sounds hours, quarters or minutes, or repeats them on request; Originally designed to help the wearer to tell the time in the dark.

    Retrograde: Hour, minute, second or calendar hand that moves across a scale and resets to zero at the end of its cycle.

    Skeletonization: Reveals the intricate symphony of moving rotors, gears and springs which power a timepiece; The open design offers an insider's view, as unnecessary metal is cut away to allow the wearer to actually see the movement's skeleton.

    Swiss Made: Since the 16th century, Switzerland has been the epicenter of watch making, producing some of the industry's greatest technological advances. The Swiss put a law into effect for all timepieces baring the words "Swiss Made": First, the movement must be assembled in Switzerland. Secondly, the movement must be cased up in Switzerland. Finally, the manufacturer must carry out the timepiece's final inspection in Switzerland.

    Tachymeter: Scale on a watch used to determine units per hour, such as average speed over a fixed distance, or distance based on speed; Typically located along the outer rim of a dial.

    Tritium: Miniature tubes containing gaseous Tritium and layered with phosphor to power the luminous accents which can be seen for several meters in darkness. Tritium illumination requires no electrical power but must be "charged" by holding your watch close to any light source. The longer you hold it there, the longer and brighter you'll see the Tritnite.

    Unidirectional Rotating Bezel: Used for tracking elapsed time. A ratchet mechanism prevents the bezel from rotating backwards. This feature is popular with divers, who rely on the elapsed time feature to prevent the diver from running out of air. The fact that the bezel cannot rotate backwards prevents the wearer from underestimating the elapsed time.

    Garnet comes in a vast rainbow of naturally exquisite hues, occurring in every color except blue. It is the family of minerals that displays the greatest variety of colors than any other mineral. The eight major types of garnets include almandine, pyrope, demantoid, grossularite, tsavorite, hessonite, rhodolite and spessartite.

    Named after the ancient gemstone city of Alabanda in Asia Minor, the most common type of garnet is almandine (also called almandite). It is a dark red to brownish red stone that is only slightly different from the chemical structure of its sister stone, called pyrope. While nature only grows pyropes in small sizes, it allows for almandine crystals to form in larger dimensions.

    Pyrope is a high-quality garnet that can be purplish red, blood red, orange-red or crimson. It is often called the Bohemian garnet since its fierce and often slightly bronze color was highly popular in the 18th and 19th century when it came from the north-eastern part of the former Kingdom of Bohemia. In Europe during the Victorian times, pyrope garnets frequently decorated jewelry with many of these small stones tightly arranged along each other like the seeds of a pomegranate. In fact, the name “garnet” most likely was derived from the pomegranate, a fruit whose deep, red-purple color resembles some varieties of the gem. Many ancient pieces of garnet jewelry are also studded with the tiny red gems.

    Demantoid is a rich green variety of garnet primarily found in the Ural Mountains of Russia. Russia’s leading court jeweler, Carl Fabergé, loved this brilliant garnet more than any other stone and used it in many of his creations that were lavishly adorned by the Tsars of Russia. Today, demantoid is appearing more often in the gemstone market because of new finds in Namibia. However, these particular garnets from Namibia lack "horsetail-inclusions,” the fine bushy-shaped inclusions that are characteristic of the sought-after Russian demantoids. The gem is quite rare and can cost several thousand dollars per carat depending on size and quality. The larger, brighter demantoid s are exceedingly scarce and have been known to show exceptional brilliance, even higher than diamonds.

    Grossularite, available in pinks, browns, greens and yellows, is especially cherished because of its many in-between shades and earth colors. In the last year of the 20th century, large grossularite occurrences were discovered in Mali. Charming because of their high brilliance, the Mali garnets make even the brown color attractive and vivid.

    Tsavorite is the trade name for a fine green grossularite. It ranges from vivid light green to velvety deep green and, like all other garnets, features a strikingly high brilliance. Tsavorite was discovered in 1967 by British geologist Campbell R. Bridges, and was re-named by Tiffany’s in New York after its occurrence near the famous game park Tsavo-National Park. Mined in Tanzania and Kenya, this particular stone is quite rare and can cost several thousand dollars per carat depending on size and quality. Larger tsavorites are exceedingly scarce.

    Hessonite is the variety name for a fine orange, cinnamon brown or pinkish variety of grossularite. It most commonly occurs in golds, oranges and browns.

    Rhodolite is a pyrope-almandine garnet that features a velvety red color with a fine purple or raspberry colored undertone. One of the most popular varieties, it is mined in East Africa, India and Sri Lanka and was originally discovered in the United States.

    Spessartite garnet can be red or blackish brown, but is most commonly available in golds, oranges and warmer browns. Originally named after its occurrence in the German Spessart Mountains, there was a surprising discovery of the bright orange-red stone in Nigeria and Namibia. Until then, spessartites had existed as mere collector’s items or rarities and were hardly ever used for jewelry because they were so rare. But the new location discovery changed the world of jewelry gemstones and spessartites made their way into jewelry fashion. The most popular type of spessartite is the mandarin garnet, a gem that features a bright orange hue.

    Traditionally given as 2nd wedding anniversary gifts, garnets are celebrated as January’s birthstone. They are found all over the world, including Africa, Australia, Eastern Europe, the Middle East, North America, South and Central America, and Southeast Asia. The garnet ranges from 7.0-7.5 on the Mohs Scale and has been given many different names throughout the gemstone trade, including Arizona Ruby, Arizona Spinel, Montana Ruby or New Mexico Ruby. The stone features a high refraction of light that creates an amazing brilliance and luminosity. In fact, Noah used a garnet lantern to illuminate the darkness and navigate the Ark through 40 days and nights of torrential rain.

    Throughout history, garnets have been widely known and prized for their rich hues and supposed mystical properties. Adored by the ancient Egyptian goddess Isis, the gem symbolized faith, truth and friendship and was a favorite of Egyptian jewelry artisans. Garnets were taken into the tombs with the dead as payment to the gods for safe passage through the nether world. It is said that King Solomon wore a large red garnet along with eleven other magical gems in his breastplate (representing the 12 steps of Jacob's Ladder) to help him win battles. Nineteenth-century Asiatic warriors even used the hard stones as bullets. In the 13th century, medieval travelers wore garnets as popular talismans and protective stones, many of which were carved with lions. The gems were thought to repel evil spirits, bad dreams and people with evil intent.

    Today, garnets are thought to have protective powers and can be carried by travelers to protect against accidents. The stone is said to light up the night and protect its owner from nightmares. It is also believed to strengthen the body and mind by sparking creativity and dispelling anger. People may use the stone to increase the power of their energy fields and gather good vibes. Current superstitions say that the stone symbolizes loyalty and can be exchanged between friends to symbolize affection and ensure they meet again.

    Quartz: Although not as mechanically complex as other engines, the quartz movement provides the most accurate and reliable time-keeping. This type of movement typically draws power from a battery and centers around a small vibrating chip of quartz crystal. When an electrical current, supplied from a battery, is applied to a quartz crystal, the current is distorted and creates a precise resonating frequency. Watchmakers employ the subsequent frequency to measure time. Some adaptations to the traditional quartz movement include introducing rotors and power cells in an effort to maintain the accuracy of quartz while eliminating the need for a battery. Quartz movements have been used in timepieces since the 1970s and are highly accurate, dependable and affordable.